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Ultimate collapse strength assessment of damaged steel-plated structures

Ultimate collapse strength assessment of damaged steel-plated structures
Ultimate collapse strength assessment of damaged steel-plated structures
In an unpredictable world where human intervention or unexpected environmental conditions can prevail, damage can occur to manmade structures. Whilst structural design allows for redundancy, or a structural capability beyond the general working load of the structure, it is necessary to be able to analyse and understand the residual capability of a damaged structure to ensure the safety of personnel in the vicinity of the structure and assess the potential to facilitate repair.

Idealised Structural Unit Method (ISUM) can allow rapid assessment of large structural arrangements by simplification into smaller constituent parts, which are assessed against pre-calculated failure data for each part. The method has potential benefits for allowing rapid assessment of damaged steel-plated structure that would otherwise require the use of high fidelity modelling of the entire structures, such as through the use of finite element analysis.

This paper presents a study on the use of ISUM to assess damaged steel-plated structures and its limitations through the collapse analysis of stiffened steel panels. A new ISUM is proposed for strength assessment of damaged structural arrangements. Analysis is undertaken to assess the effects of geometrical and material property variations that can occur in a structure as well as the effects of damage aperture size and shape on the collapse strength of stiffened steel panels. The study shows that while ISUM can be applied in the assessment of damaged steel-plated structures, implementing the proposed new ISUM allows greater accuracy in the calculation of the collapse strength of damaged stiffened steel panels. The paper also concludes that the assessment of larger structural units for application in the ISUM assessment, will allow the effects of the damage on surrounding structure to be captured, which can influence the deflection shapes that will lead to collapse of the structure.
idealised structural unit method (ISUM), ultimate collapse strength, damaged steel-plated structures
0141-0296
1-10
Underwood, J.M.
33c3f872-a086-40b1-89ec-a5dd39c32418
Sobey, Adam J.
e850606f-aa79-4c99-8682-2cfffda3cd28
Blake, J.I.R.
6afa420d-0936-4acc-861b-36885406c891
Shenoi, R.A.
a37b4e0a-06f1-425f-966d-71e6fa299960
Underwood, J.M.
33c3f872-a086-40b1-89ec-a5dd39c32418
Sobey, Adam J.
e850606f-aa79-4c99-8682-2cfffda3cd28
Blake, J.I.R.
6afa420d-0936-4acc-861b-36885406c891
Shenoi, R.A.
a37b4e0a-06f1-425f-966d-71e6fa299960

Underwood, J.M., Sobey, Adam J., Blake, J.I.R. and Shenoi, R.A. (2012) Ultimate collapse strength assessment of damaged steel-plated structures. Engineering Structures, 38, 1-10. (doi:10.1016/j.engstruct.2011.12.045).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In an unpredictable world where human intervention or unexpected environmental conditions can prevail, damage can occur to manmade structures. Whilst structural design allows for redundancy, or a structural capability beyond the general working load of the structure, it is necessary to be able to analyse and understand the residual capability of a damaged structure to ensure the safety of personnel in the vicinity of the structure and assess the potential to facilitate repair.

Idealised Structural Unit Method (ISUM) can allow rapid assessment of large structural arrangements by simplification into smaller constituent parts, which are assessed against pre-calculated failure data for each part. The method has potential benefits for allowing rapid assessment of damaged steel-plated structure that would otherwise require the use of high fidelity modelling of the entire structures, such as through the use of finite element analysis.

This paper presents a study on the use of ISUM to assess damaged steel-plated structures and its limitations through the collapse analysis of stiffened steel panels. A new ISUM is proposed for strength assessment of damaged structural arrangements. Analysis is undertaken to assess the effects of geometrical and material property variations that can occur in a structure as well as the effects of damage aperture size and shape on the collapse strength of stiffened steel panels. The study shows that while ISUM can be applied in the assessment of damaged steel-plated structures, implementing the proposed new ISUM allows greater accuracy in the calculation of the collapse strength of damaged stiffened steel panels. The paper also concludes that the assessment of larger structural units for application in the ISUM assessment, will allow the effects of the damage on surrounding structure to be captured, which can influence the deflection shapes that will lead to collapse of the structure.

Text
FIANL Ultimate Collapse Strength Assessment of Damaged Steel Structures.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 8 February 2012
Published date: May 2012
Keywords: idealised structural unit method (ISUM), ultimate collapse strength, damaged steel-plated structures
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 300504
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/300504
ISSN: 0141-0296
PURE UUID: 2d07b9c3-8750-4b60-9fc6-95401d8d6ea3
ORCID for Adam J. Sobey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6880-8338
ORCID for J.I.R. Blake: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5291-8233

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Feb 2012 12:08
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:09

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Contributors

Author: J.M. Underwood
Author: Adam J. Sobey ORCID iD
Author: J.I.R. Blake ORCID iD
Author: R.A. Shenoi

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