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Voluntary sector organisations working at the neighbourhood level in England: patterns by local area deprivation

Voluntary sector organisations working at the neighbourhood level in England: patterns by local area deprivation
Voluntary sector organisations working at the neighbourhood level in England: patterns by local area deprivation
Geographical variations in voluntary sector activity are important where they lead to inequity in service provision and differences in the opportunity to participate in voluntary group activities. However, despite important theoretical work, very little work has demonstrated variation empirically, particularly variation at the local (neighbourhood) level. This paper, for the first time, examines nationally representative data to illustrate the very real geographical differences across England in the prevalence of voluntary organisations working at a neighbourhood scale. Overall, less deprived local areas have a much higher prevalence than more deprived local areas. While certain kinds of organisations are more prevalent in more deprived areas, including those working in the field of economic well-being, this reflects the presence of organisations which receive public funds. These patterns are consistent with a key element of ‘voluntary sector failure’, resource insufficiency, and the important role of government in ensuring resources are available in areas of particular need.
voluntary sector, neighbourhood, public funding
0308-518X
1148-1164
Clifford, David
9686f96b-3d0c-48d2-a694-00c87b536fde
Clifford, David
9686f96b-3d0c-48d2-a694-00c87b536fde

Clifford, David (2012) Voluntary sector organisations working at the neighbourhood level in England: patterns by local area deprivation. Environment and Planning A, 44 (5), 1148-1164.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Geographical variations in voluntary sector activity are important where they lead to inequity in service provision and differences in the opportunity to participate in voluntary group activities. However, despite important theoretical work, very little work has demonstrated variation empirically, particularly variation at the local (neighbourhood) level. This paper, for the first time, examines nationally representative data to illustrate the very real geographical differences across England in the prevalence of voluntary organisations working at a neighbourhood scale. Overall, less deprived local areas have a much higher prevalence than more deprived local areas. While certain kinds of organisations are more prevalent in more deprived areas, including those working in the field of economic well-being, this reflects the presence of organisations which receive public funds. These patterns are consistent with a key element of ‘voluntary sector failure’, resource insufficiency, and the important role of government in ensuring resources are available in areas of particular need.

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More information

Published date: 2012
Keywords: voluntary sector, neighbourhood, public funding
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 301290
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/301290
ISSN: 0308-518X
PURE UUID: 1b48e9e5-28a4-4420-aa28-0aa867d854de

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Feb 2012 14:26
Last modified: 07 Oct 2017 12:28

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