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Theoretical analysis of a methane gas detection system using the complementary source modulation of correlation spectroscopy

Theoretical analysis of a methane gas detection system using the complementary source modulation of correlation spectroscopy
Theoretical analysis of a methane gas detection system using the complementary source modulation of correlation spectroscopy
Results from simulations of the response of a methane gas sensor using optical correlation spectroscopy (CoSp) are presented. Predictions of the sensor response, signal/noise performance and detection sensitivity are made for a typical fibre optic-coupled system. Spectral absorption data of the gases is obtained from the publicly available HITRAN database. Emphasis is placed on the effects on the detection sensitivity of varying (a) the optical filter characteristics, i.e. center wavelength and bandwidth, and (b)the concentration (partial pressure) of CH4 a theoretical noise-limited detection limit below 1 ppm is predicted.
The cross-sensitivity to water vapor is derived and compared to that which would occur with a conventional broadband absorption method, i.e. one that would not exhibit the same selectivity as the CoSp method. This work is important for predicting the responsivity, sensitivity and crosstalk performance of practical CoSp gas detection systems.
methane gas detection, correlation spectroscopy, optical absorption, environmental monitoring
0957-0233
1629-1636
Chambers, Paul
1a8fdd11-d8bd-4677-b69b-62c8d22141d2
Austin, Ed A.D.
f69049d8-7f8c-46ce-bdb4-7de6ff9ab898
Dakin, John P.
04891b9b-5fb5-4245-879e-9e7361adf904
Chambers, Paul
1a8fdd11-d8bd-4677-b69b-62c8d22141d2
Austin, Ed A.D.
f69049d8-7f8c-46ce-bdb4-7de6ff9ab898
Dakin, John P.
04891b9b-5fb5-4245-879e-9e7361adf904

Chambers, Paul, Austin, Ed A.D. and Dakin, John P. (2004) Theoretical analysis of a methane gas detection system using the complementary source modulation of correlation spectroscopy. Measurement Science and Technology, 15, 1629-1636. (doi:10.1088/0957-0233/15/8/034).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Results from simulations of the response of a methane gas sensor using optical correlation spectroscopy (CoSp) are presented. Predictions of the sensor response, signal/noise performance and detection sensitivity are made for a typical fibre optic-coupled system. Spectral absorption data of the gases is obtained from the publicly available HITRAN database. Emphasis is placed on the effects on the detection sensitivity of varying (a) the optical filter characteristics, i.e. center wavelength and bandwidth, and (b)the concentration (partial pressure) of CH4 a theoretical noise-limited detection limit below 1 ppm is predicted.
The cross-sensitivity to water vapor is derived and compared to that which would occur with a conventional broadband absorption method, i.e. one that would not exhibit the same selectivity as the CoSp method. This work is important for predicting the responsivity, sensitivity and crosstalk performance of practical CoSp gas detection systems.

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More information

Published date: 2004
Additional Information: Publication No: 2864
Keywords: methane gas detection, correlation spectroscopy, optical absorption, environmental monitoring

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 30224
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/30224
ISSN: 0957-0233
PURE UUID: 4ebc7f34-7352-4c76-ac70-b81778da18a5

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 May 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:07

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