The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Evaluating impact damage in CFRP using fibre optic sensors

Evaluating impact damage in CFRP using fibre optic sensors
Evaluating impact damage in CFRP using fibre optic sensors
Damage in unidirectional carbon/fibre composite resulting from both low and high velocity/energy impacts was evaluated using embedded fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, C-scan and microscopic analysis. It was found that the FBG sensors located 10mm from the impact site could detect residual strains from a 0.33J (1.3ms-1) impact which was not detectable by C-scan or visual inspection. The measured residual strain increased with impact energy and damage changed from matrix cracking to severe delaminations.. High velocity impacts (225ms-1, 11J) resulted in test panel perforation and delaminations. FBG sensors located within a distance of 2 - 3 the damage radius detected residual strain from the impact. With an array of embedded sensors it is believed that it will be possible to identify the site of both low and high velocity energy impacts and predict the damage from the response of the adjacent sensors providing the sensors are located sufficiently close to the impact site
CFRP, impact damage, fibre-optic sensors
0266-3538
1235-1242
Chambers, A.R.
74fa9b7e-6362-478e-a038-15f2828c5446
Mowlem, M.C.
6f633ca2-298f-48ee-a025-ce52dd62124f
Dokos, L.
7676614c-2b1e-45ce-a553-2ed8871a62c0
Chambers, A.R.
74fa9b7e-6362-478e-a038-15f2828c5446
Mowlem, M.C.
6f633ca2-298f-48ee-a025-ce52dd62124f
Dokos, L.
7676614c-2b1e-45ce-a553-2ed8871a62c0

Chambers, A.R., Mowlem, M.C. and Dokos, L. (2007) Evaluating impact damage in CFRP using fibre optic sensors. Composites Science and Technology, 67 (6), 1235-1242. (doi:10.1016/j.compscitech.2006.05.023).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Damage in unidirectional carbon/fibre composite resulting from both low and high velocity/energy impacts was evaluated using embedded fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, C-scan and microscopic analysis. It was found that the FBG sensors located 10mm from the impact site could detect residual strains from a 0.33J (1.3ms-1) impact which was not detectable by C-scan or visual inspection. The measured residual strain increased with impact energy and damage changed from matrix cracking to severe delaminations.. High velocity impacts (225ms-1, 11J) resulted in test panel perforation and delaminations. FBG sensors located within a distance of 2 - 3 the damage radius detected residual strain from the impact. With an array of embedded sensors it is believed that it will be possible to identify the site of both low and high velocity energy impacts and predict the damage from the response of the adjacent sensors providing the sensors are located sufficiently close to the impact site

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Submitted date: 11 February 2006
Published date: May 2007
Additional Information: This paper considers the potential for using fibre Bragg gratings for detecting impact damage in composite materials. It is original in that the research concentrates on identifying damage mechanisms from strain readings in both low and high velocity impacts.
Keywords: CFRP, impact damage, fibre-optic sensors

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 30263
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/30263
ISSN: 0266-3538
PURE UUID: a40c1db2-6e67-4194-94d3-12406c387acc

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 May 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:07

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×