The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Waves and climate change in the north-east Atlantic

Waves and climate change in the north-east Atlantic
Waves and climate change in the north-east Atlantic
Wave height in the North Atlantic has been observed to increase over the last quarter-century, based on monthly-mean data derived from observations. Empirical models have linked a large part of this increase in wave height with the North Atlantic Oscillation. Wave models provide a tool to study impacts of various climate change scenarios and investigate physical explanations of statistical results. In this case we use a wave model of the NE Atlantic. Model tests were carried out, using synthetic wind fields, varying the strength of the prevailing westerly winds and the frequency and intensity of storms, the location of storm tracks and the storm propagation speed. The strength of the westerly winds is most effective at increasing mean and maximum monthly wave height. The frequency, intensity, track and speed of storms have little effect on the mean wave height but intensity, track and speed significantly affect maximum wave height.
0094-8276
L06604
Wolf, J.
13cf5067-f460-4851-9a09-d6bf7efe575b
Woolf, D.K.
aeb210e8-5fd5-4dd4-903e-6d4ef2df9abe
Wolf, J.
13cf5067-f460-4851-9a09-d6bf7efe575b
Woolf, D.K.
aeb210e8-5fd5-4dd4-903e-6d4ef2df9abe

Wolf, J. and Woolf, D.K. (2006) Waves and climate change in the north-east Atlantic. Geophysical Research Letters, 33 (6), L06604. (doi:10.1029/2005GL025113).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Wave height in the North Atlantic has been observed to increase over the last quarter-century, based on monthly-mean data derived from observations. Empirical models have linked a large part of this increase in wave height with the North Atlantic Oscillation. Wave models provide a tool to study impacts of various climate change scenarios and investigate physical explanations of statistical results. In this case we use a wave model of the NE Atlantic. Model tests were carried out, using synthetic wind fields, varying the strength of the prevailing westerly winds and the frequency and intensity of storms, the location of storm tracks and the storm propagation speed. The strength of the westerly winds is most effective at increasing mean and maximum monthly wave height. The frequency, intensity, track and speed of storms have little effect on the mean wave height but intensity, track and speed significantly affect maximum wave height.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 2006
Organisations: National Oceanography Centre,Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 32875
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/32875
ISSN: 0094-8276
PURE UUID: 3bb57ede-95b0-44b1-95ea-c9bc3dc7bd68

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 May 2006
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 20:39

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: J. Wolf
Author: D.K. Woolf

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×