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On the detection objects buried at a shallow depth using seismic wave reflections

On the detection objects buried at a shallow depth using seismic wave reflections
On the detection objects buried at a shallow depth using seismic wave reflections
This paper concerns the detection of shallow (of the order 1 m) buried objects using seismic excitation. Time-extended signals are used to generate a compressional wave using a shaker attached to the ground. The wave propagates through the ground, reflects off a buried object and is captured by an array of geophones on the surface. The envelopes of the cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and the excitation signal are calculated and summed to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. The wide cross-correlation peaks caused by high ground attenuation are partially compensated for by using the generalized cross-correlation function called the phase transform. Simple simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method, and some field experiments have been carried out aimed at the detection of a buried concrete pipe. In the experiments the pipe could be detected using the method proposed, with experimental and simulated data producing good agreement.
0001-4966
1366-1374
Papandreou, Ben
df5b58cf-c49c-45f1-a3e7-01ed286d970d
Brennan, Michael J.
87c7bca3-a9e5-46aa-9153-34c712355a13
Rustighi, Emiliano
9544ced4-5057-4491-a45c-643873dfed96
Papandreou, Ben
df5b58cf-c49c-45f1-a3e7-01ed286d970d
Brennan, Michael J.
87c7bca3-a9e5-46aa-9153-34c712355a13
Rustighi, Emiliano
9544ced4-5057-4491-a45c-643873dfed96

Papandreou, Ben, Brennan, Michael J. and Rustighi, Emiliano (2011) On the detection objects buried at a shallow depth using seismic wave reflections. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 129 (3), 1366-1374. (doi:10.1121/1.3552878). (PMID:21428500)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper concerns the detection of shallow (of the order 1 m) buried objects using seismic excitation. Time-extended signals are used to generate a compressional wave using a shaker attached to the ground. The wave propagates through the ground, reflects off a buried object and is captured by an array of geophones on the surface. The envelopes of the cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and the excitation signal are calculated and summed to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. The wide cross-correlation peaks caused by high ground attenuation are partially compensated for by using the generalized cross-correlation function called the phase transform. Simple simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method, and some field experiments have been carried out aimed at the detection of a buried concrete pipe. In the experiments the pipe could be detected using the method proposed, with experimental and simulated data producing good agreement.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 9 March 2011
Published date: March 2011
Organisations: Dynamics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 333352
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/333352
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 8cdc3e6d-4095-4205-9170-56da0a8d613d
ORCID for Emiliano Rustighi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9871-7795

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Date deposited: 06 Mar 2012 12:10
Last modified: 26 Oct 2023 23:23

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Contributors

Author: Ben Papandreou
Author: Michael J. Brennan

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