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Increased fat mass is associated with increased bone size but reduced volumetric density in pre pubertal children

Increased fat mass is associated with increased bone size but reduced volumetric density in pre pubertal children
Increased fat mass is associated with increased bone size but reduced volumetric density in pre pubertal children
Recent studies have shown that obesity is associated with an increased risk of fracture in both adults and
children. It has been suggested that, despite greater bone size, obese individuals may have reduced true
volumetric density; however this is difficult to assess using two dimensional techniques such as DXA. We
evaluated the relationship between fat mass, and bone size and density, in a population cohort of children in
whom DXA and pQCT measurements had been acquired.
We recruited 530 children at 6 years old from the Southampton Women's Survey. The children underwent
measurement of bone mass at the whole body, lumbar spine and hip, together with body composition, by DXA
(Hologic Discovery, Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA, USA). In addition 132 of these children underwent pQCT
measurements at the tibia (Stratec XCT2000, Stratec Biomedical Systems, Birkenfeld, Germany).
Significant positive associations were observed between total fat mass and both bone area (BA) and bone
mineral content (BMC) at the whole body minus head, lumbar spine and hip sites (all pb0.0001). When true
volumetric density was assessed using pQCT data from the tibia, fat mass (adjusted for lean mass) was
negatively associated with both trabecular and cortical density (?=?14.6 mg/mm3 per sd, p=0.003; ?=
?7.7 mg/mm3 per sd, p=0.02 respectively).
These results suggest that fat mass is negatively associated with volumetric bone density at 6 years old,
independent of lean mass, despite positive associations with bone size.
epidemiology, osteoporosis, obesity, volumetric density, pQCT, DXA
8756-3282
562-567
Cole, Z. A.
6802e58a-59b3-4518-bb7d-6f721732cd61
Harvey, N. C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Kim, M.
c2e4ad50-0a64-4da9-8335-78531d88e93d
Ntani, G.
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Robinson, S. M.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Inskip, H. M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, K. M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, E. M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cole, Z. A.
6802e58a-59b3-4518-bb7d-6f721732cd61
Harvey, N. C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Kim, M.
c2e4ad50-0a64-4da9-8335-78531d88e93d
Ntani, G.
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Robinson, S. M.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Inskip, H. M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, K. M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, E. M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1

Cole, Z. A., Harvey, N. C., Kim, M., Ntani, G., Robinson, S. M., Inskip, H. M., Godfrey, K. M., Cooper, C. and Dennison, E. M. (2012) Increased fat mass is associated with increased bone size but reduced volumetric density in pre pubertal children. Bone, 50 (2), 562-567. (PMID:21600324)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that obesity is associated with an increased risk of fracture in both adults and
children. It has been suggested that, despite greater bone size, obese individuals may have reduced true
volumetric density; however this is difficult to assess using two dimensional techniques such as DXA. We
evaluated the relationship between fat mass, and bone size and density, in a population cohort of children in
whom DXA and pQCT measurements had been acquired.
We recruited 530 children at 6 years old from the Southampton Women's Survey. The children underwent
measurement of bone mass at the whole body, lumbar spine and hip, together with body composition, by DXA
(Hologic Discovery, Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA, USA). In addition 132 of these children underwent pQCT
measurements at the tibia (Stratec XCT2000, Stratec Biomedical Systems, Birkenfeld, Germany).
Significant positive associations were observed between total fat mass and both bone area (BA) and bone
mineral content (BMC) at the whole body minus head, lumbar spine and hip sites (all pb0.0001). When true
volumetric density was assessed using pQCT data from the tibia, fat mass (adjusted for lean mass) was
negatively associated with both trabecular and cortical density (?=?14.6 mg/mm3 per sd, p=0.003; ?=
?7.7 mg/mm3 per sd, p=0.02 respectively).
These results suggest that fat mass is negatively associated with volumetric bone density at 6 years old,
independent of lean mass, despite positive associations with bone size.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: February 2012
Keywords: epidemiology, osteoporosis, obesity, volumetric density, pQCT, DXA
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 334430
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/334430
ISSN: 8756-3282
PURE UUID: c39960a9-4c44-43ce-a5c9-4e75d2dc1865
ORCID for N. C. Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512
ORCID for S. M. Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269
ORCID for H. M. Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for K. M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for E. M. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Mar 2012 11:19
Last modified: 01 Feb 2019 01:35

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