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Quality of life among older people with poor functioning. The influence of perceived control over life

Quality of life among older people with poor functioning. The influence of perceived control over life
Quality of life among older people with poor functioning. The influence of perceived control over life
Objective: to investigate the apparently incongruous coupling of poor physical functioning with high QoL.
Study design and setting: face-to-face interview survey of random sample of 999 people aged 65+ across Britain.
Results: twenty-one per cent of respondents reported fairly to very severe levels of functional difficulty, and 62% of these rated their QoL as 'good'. Better self-rated health, lower burden of chronic disease, not having fallen, higher social engagement and higher levels of perceived control over life, distinguished between people who had difficulties with physical functioning and who perceived their QoL to be 'good', rather than 'not good'. The open-ended survey responses broadly supported the quantitative findings.
Conclusion: people with difficulties with physical functioning, who perceived their QoL to be 'not good', as opposed to 'good', were adversely affected by a higher burden of disease and having fewer socio-psychological resources to help them to cope effectively.
physical functioning, quality of life, health status, elderly, old age, control, disability paradox, health, odds
0002-0729
310 - 315
Bowling, Ann
796ca209-687f-4079-8a40-572076251936
Seetai, Sharon
a790a9f7-dab5-4221-abfa-e3eb34283408
Morris, Richard
09dc599c-6848-41f5-a170-7408d4128f05
Ebrahim, Shah
0f2ade5c-4ef6-4ca7-9f9b-9b60ba192b13
Bowling, Ann
796ca209-687f-4079-8a40-572076251936
Seetai, Sharon
a790a9f7-dab5-4221-abfa-e3eb34283408
Morris, Richard
09dc599c-6848-41f5-a170-7408d4128f05
Ebrahim, Shah
0f2ade5c-4ef6-4ca7-9f9b-9b60ba192b13

Bowling, Ann, Seetai, Sharon, Morris, Richard and Ebrahim, Shah (2007) Quality of life among older people with poor functioning. The influence of perceived control over life. Age and Ageing, 36 (3), 310 - 315. (doi:10.1093/ageing/afm023). (PMID:17387124)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: to investigate the apparently incongruous coupling of poor physical functioning with high QoL.
Study design and setting: face-to-face interview survey of random sample of 999 people aged 65+ across Britain.
Results: twenty-one per cent of respondents reported fairly to very severe levels of functional difficulty, and 62% of these rated their QoL as 'good'. Better self-rated health, lower burden of chronic disease, not having fallen, higher social engagement and higher levels of perceived control over life, distinguished between people who had difficulties with physical functioning and who perceived their QoL to be 'good', rather than 'not good'. The open-ended survey responses broadly supported the quantitative findings.
Conclusion: people with difficulties with physical functioning, who perceived their QoL to be 'not good', as opposed to 'good', were adversely affected by a higher burden of disease and having fewer socio-psychological resources to help them to cope effectively.

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More information

Published date: 26 March 2007
Keywords: physical functioning, quality of life, health status, elderly, old age, control, disability paradox, health, odds
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 334568
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/334568
ISSN: 0002-0729
PURE UUID: 2d832ce8-731d-40e3-8f2d-f9f7452701f3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Mar 2012 12:56
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:11

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