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The effect of definitions of activities of daily living on estimates of changing ability among older people

The effect of definitions of activities of daily living on estimates of changing ability among older people
The effect of definitions of activities of daily living on estimates of changing ability among older people
Physical functioning status is often assessed using scales of activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living. Different ways of defining change in adequacy of performance of both activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living tasks may be used, including increasing difficulty in performance, the need for assistance and inability to do tasks. In this prospective study, we investigated the effect of different definitions of decline on estimates of physical function, and explored the relationships between decline in each activity of daily living individually and potential predictors. The study was based on a sample of 999 individuals aged 65 years or more who participated in a national survey of quality of life, of whom 531 (68% of those eligible for follow up) responded 12-18 months later. Different definitions of decline were used and the prevalence of decline was, depending on the individual activities of daily living item, used as an outcome in logistic regression models. The results showed that the strength of association with chronic diseases, demographic, psychological and environmental factors varied by altering the activities of daily living item used. Decline in ability to walk 400 yards was strongly associated with respiratory problems (odds ratio 3.5 [95% confidence interval 1.3-9.0]) while decline in ability to get on a bus was associated with musculoskeletal problems (odds ratio 2.8 [95% confidence interval 1.4-5.6]). In conclusion, the prevalence of decline varies by definition, and summary measures which are customarily used to describe disability, may be inadequate for the assessment and identification of predictors of decline in functional ability.
activities of daily living, decline, older people, physical function, quality of life, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY, INSTRUMENTAL ACTIVITIES, PHYSICAL-DISABILITY, UNITED-STATES, HEALTH, ADULTS, DEPENDENCE, ILLNESS, RISK
0342-5282
39 - 46
Ayis, S.A.
00487b37-d7ea-45d5-8de2-eb6aac01a9b7
Bowling, A.
796ca209-687f-4079-8a40-572076251936
Gooberman-Hill, R.
69f671d8-888b-4249-8a26-59c1b6ed85d2
Ebrahim, S.
cc462d6d-f796-479f-8126-7a48fcb965d4
Ayis, S.A.
00487b37-d7ea-45d5-8de2-eb6aac01a9b7
Bowling, A.
796ca209-687f-4079-8a40-572076251936
Gooberman-Hill, R.
69f671d8-888b-4249-8a26-59c1b6ed85d2
Ebrahim, S.
cc462d6d-f796-479f-8126-7a48fcb965d4

Ayis, S.A., Bowling, A., Gooberman-Hill, R. and Ebrahim, S. (2007) The effect of definitions of activities of daily living on estimates of changing ability among older people. International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 30 (1), 39 - 46. (doi:10.1097/MRR.0b013e328013dafb). (PMID:17293719)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Physical functioning status is often assessed using scales of activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living. Different ways of defining change in adequacy of performance of both activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living tasks may be used, including increasing difficulty in performance, the need for assistance and inability to do tasks. In this prospective study, we investigated the effect of different definitions of decline on estimates of physical function, and explored the relationships between decline in each activity of daily living individually and potential predictors. The study was based on a sample of 999 individuals aged 65 years or more who participated in a national survey of quality of life, of whom 531 (68% of those eligible for follow up) responded 12-18 months later. Different definitions of decline were used and the prevalence of decline was, depending on the individual activities of daily living item, used as an outcome in logistic regression models. The results showed that the strength of association with chronic diseases, demographic, psychological and environmental factors varied by altering the activities of daily living item used. Decline in ability to walk 400 yards was strongly associated with respiratory problems (odds ratio 3.5 [95% confidence interval 1.3-9.0]) while decline in ability to get on a bus was associated with musculoskeletal problems (odds ratio 2.8 [95% confidence interval 1.4-5.6]). In conclusion, the prevalence of decline varies by definition, and summary measures which are customarily used to describe disability, may be inadequate for the assessment and identification of predictors of decline in functional ability.

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More information

Published date: March 2007
Keywords: activities of daily living, decline, older people, physical function, quality of life, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY, INSTRUMENTAL ACTIVITIES, PHYSICAL-DISABILITY, UNITED-STATES, HEALTH, ADULTS, DEPENDENCE, ILLNESS, RISK
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 334570
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/334570
ISSN: 0342-5282
PURE UUID: f2bc9d1d-4d36-41bb-b64e-8dddd21b5b40

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Mar 2012 16:08
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 22:09

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