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Do perceptions of neighbourhood environment influence health? Baseline findings from a British survey of aging

Do perceptions of neighbourhood environment influence health? Baseline findings from a British survey of aging
Do perceptions of neighbourhood environment influence health? Baseline findings from a British survey of aging
Objectives: To investigate the relation between perceived neighbourhood environment, social contact and support, and self efficacy, on the health of older people.Design: British cross sectional population survey of people aged 65 and over.Participants: 999 people aged 65 plus living at home in Britain.Results: Regression modelling showed that high self efficacy had a strong independent association with better self rated health status and physical functioning. Indicators of perceived neighbourhood environment that showed strong associations with both good health and functioning were: perceptions of good quality facilities in the area (social/leisure, facilities for people aged 65+, rubbish collection, health services, transport, closeness to shops, somewhere nice to walk), and high levels of neighbourliness (knows/trusts people). Perceptions of problems in the area (noise, crime, air quality, rubbish/litter, traffic, graffiti) were also predictive of poorer health. Measures of social contact and support did not show any independent associations with health or functioning.Conclusions: The unique value of this paper is in the simultaneous analysis of associations between perceived neighbourhood, social contact and support, self efficacy, and health. The consistent strength of older people's perceptions of the quality of facilities in their neighbourhoods shows that responsive reinforcement of local infrastructures might have wider health benefits. Also of interest was the strength of self efficacy as a predictor of self rated health and physical functioning. The results have implications for both neighbourhood level interventions and self management programmes in chronic illness.
SELF-RATED HEALTH, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, POLITICAL-ECONOMY, SOCIAL SUPPORT, PUBLIC-HEALTH, SOCIOECONOMIC CONTEXT, MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS, REPORTED HEALTH, ALAMEDA COUNTY, OLDER-ADULTS
0143-005X
476 - 483
Bowling, Ann
796ca209-687f-4079-8a40-572076251936
Barber, J.
a130af2c-9cc2-42f5-8a2b-0febcbdc6e2c
Morris, R.
b7cbbd1c-ba42-4140-aa43-140fc0f1d162
Ebrahim, S.
cc462d6d-f796-479f-8126-7a48fcb965d4
Bowling, Ann
796ca209-687f-4079-8a40-572076251936
Barber, J.
a130af2c-9cc2-42f5-8a2b-0febcbdc6e2c
Morris, R.
b7cbbd1c-ba42-4140-aa43-140fc0f1d162
Ebrahim, S.
cc462d6d-f796-479f-8126-7a48fcb965d4

Bowling, Ann, Barber, J., Morris, R. and Ebrahim, S. (2006) Do perceptions of neighbourhood environment influence health? Baseline findings from a British survey of aging. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 60 (6), 476 - 483. (doi:10.1136/jech.2005.039032).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the relation between perceived neighbourhood environment, social contact and support, and self efficacy, on the health of older people.Design: British cross sectional population survey of people aged 65 and over.Participants: 999 people aged 65 plus living at home in Britain.Results: Regression modelling showed that high self efficacy had a strong independent association with better self rated health status and physical functioning. Indicators of perceived neighbourhood environment that showed strong associations with both good health and functioning were: perceptions of good quality facilities in the area (social/leisure, facilities for people aged 65+, rubbish collection, health services, transport, closeness to shops, somewhere nice to walk), and high levels of neighbourliness (knows/trusts people). Perceptions of problems in the area (noise, crime, air quality, rubbish/litter, traffic, graffiti) were also predictive of poorer health. Measures of social contact and support did not show any independent associations with health or functioning.Conclusions: The unique value of this paper is in the simultaneous analysis of associations between perceived neighbourhood, social contact and support, self efficacy, and health. The consistent strength of older people's perceptions of the quality of facilities in their neighbourhoods shows that responsive reinforcement of local infrastructures might have wider health benefits. Also of interest was the strength of self efficacy as a predictor of self rated health and physical functioning. The results have implications for both neighbourhood level interventions and self management programmes in chronic illness.

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: SELF-RATED HEALTH, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, POLITICAL-ECONOMY, SOCIAL SUPPORT, PUBLIC-HEALTH, SOCIOECONOMIC CONTEXT, MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS, REPORTED HEALTH, ALAMEDA COUNTY, OLDER-ADULTS
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 334594
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/334594
ISSN: 0143-005X
PURE UUID: bad76c55-066c-4023-ae9e-4efb66d6ae11

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Date deposited: 29 Mar 2012 12:23
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:11

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