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Short form 36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire: which normative data should be used? Comparisons between the norms provided by the omnibus survey in Britain, the Health Survey for England and the Oxford Healthy Life Survey

Bowling, A., Bond, M., Jenkinson, C. and Lamping, D.L. (1999) Short form 36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire: which normative data should be used? Comparisons between the norms provided by the omnibus survey in Britain, the Health Survey for England and the Oxford Healthy Life Survey Journal of Public Health, 21, (3), 255 - 270. (doi:10.1093/pubmed/21.3.255).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background Population norms for the attributes included in measurement scales are required to provide a standard with which scores from other study populations can be compared. This study aimed to obtain population norms for the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire, derived from a random sample of the population in Britain who were interviewed at home, and to make comparisons with other commonly used norms.Methods The method was a face-to-face interview survey of a random sample of 2056 adults living at home in Britain (response rate 78 per cent). Comparisons of the SF-36 scores derived from this sample were made with the Health Survey for England and the Oxford Healthy Life Survey.Results Controlling for age and sex, many of mean scores on the SF-36 dimensions differed between the three datasets. The British interview sample had better total means for Physical Functioning, Social Functioning, Mental Health, Energy/Vitality, and General Health Perceptions. The Health (interview) Survey for England had the lowest (worst) total mean scores for Physical Functioning, Social Functioning, Role Limitations (physical) Bodily Pain, and Health Perceptions. The postal sample in central England had the lowest (worst) total mean scores for Role Limitations (emotional), Mental Health and Energy/Vitality.Conclusion Responses obtained from interview methods may suffer more from social desirability bias (resulting in inflated SF-36 scores) than postal surveys. Differences in SF-36 means between surveys are also likely to reflect question order and contextual effects of the questionnaires. This indicates the importance of providing mode-specific population norms for the various methods of questionnaire administration.

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More information

Published date: 1999
Keywords: SF-36, health status, methodology, questionnaires, MEDICAL OUTCOMES, INTERVIEW, TELEPHONE, ADULTS, SCORES, CARE, MAIL
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 334722
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/334722
ISSN: 1741-3842
PURE UUID: 9468d237-c8bf-407e-9388-7809a6dbd52d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Mar 2012 10:01
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:11

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Contributors

Author: A. Bowling
Author: M. Bond
Author: C. Jenkinson
Author: D.L. Lamping

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