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Climate change and everyday life: repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue

Climate change and everyday life: repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue
Climate change and everyday life: repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue
There are only a few studies about how primary school students engage in socio-scientific discussions. This study aims to add to this field of research by focusing on how 9–10-year-olds in Sweden and England handle climate change as a complex environmental socio-scientific issue(SSI), within the context of their own lives and in relation to society at large. It focuses on how different interpretative repertoires were used by the students in discussions to legitimise or question their everyday lifestyles. They discussed four possible options that a government might consider to help reduce carbon dioxide production. Six main repertoires were identified: Everyday life, Self-Interest, Environment, Science and Technology, Society and Justice. The Everyday life repertoire was used when students related their discussion to their everyday lifestyles. Science
and technology-related solutions were offered to maintain or improve things, but these weresometimes rather unrealistic. Arguments related to environment and health frequently appeared to have a superior status compared to the others. Findings also highlighted how conflicts between
the students were actually productive by bringing in several perspectives to negotiate the solutions. These primary school students were, therefore, able to discuss and negotiate a complex real-world SSI. Students positioned themselves as active contributors to society, using their life experiences and limited knowledge to understand the problems that affected their everyday lives.Honing these skills within a school science community of practice could facilitate primary students’ engagement with SSIs and empower them as citizens.
0950-0693
1491-1509
Byrne, Jenny
135bc0f8-7c8a-42d9-bdae-5934b832c4bf
Ideland, Malin
4c847275-d119-45fc-9cd2-ee12c5e57717
Malmberg, Claes
3f004dee-c4e5-401e-bdd3-9f54067855a7
Grace, Marcus
bb019e62-4134-4f74-9e2c-d235a6f89b97
Byrne, Jenny
135bc0f8-7c8a-42d9-bdae-5934b832c4bf
Ideland, Malin
4c847275-d119-45fc-9cd2-ee12c5e57717
Malmberg, Claes
3f004dee-c4e5-401e-bdd3-9f54067855a7
Grace, Marcus
bb019e62-4134-4f74-9e2c-d235a6f89b97

Byrne, Jenny, Ideland, Malin and Malmberg, Claes et al. (2014) Climate change and everyday life: repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue. International Journal of Science Education, 36 (9), 1491-1509. (doi:10.1080/09500693.2014.891159).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There are only a few studies about how primary school students engage in socio-scientific discussions. This study aims to add to this field of research by focusing on how 9–10-year-olds in Sweden and England handle climate change as a complex environmental socio-scientific issue(SSI), within the context of their own lives and in relation to society at large. It focuses on how different interpretative repertoires were used by the students in discussions to legitimise or question their everyday lifestyles. They discussed four possible options that a government might consider to help reduce carbon dioxide production. Six main repertoires were identified: Everyday life, Self-Interest, Environment, Science and Technology, Society and Justice. The Everyday life repertoire was used when students related their discussion to their everyday lifestyles. Science
and technology-related solutions were offered to maintain or improve things, but these weresometimes rather unrealistic. Arguments related to environment and health frequently appeared to have a superior status compared to the others. Findings also highlighted how conflicts between
the students were actually productive by bringing in several perspectives to negotiate the solutions. These primary school students were, therefore, able to discuss and negotiate a complex real-world SSI. Students positioned themselves as active contributors to society, using their life experiences and limited knowledge to understand the problems that affected their everyday lives.Honing these skills within a school science community of practice could facilitate primary students’ engagement with SSIs and empower them as citizens.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 6 March 2014
Published date: 2014
Organisations: Southampton Education School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 336301
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/336301
ISSN: 0950-0693
PURE UUID: 6f5e358e-fe9b-4453-a534-0d1cea92f790
ORCID for Jenny Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6969-5539
ORCID for Marcus Grace: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1949-1765

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Date deposited: 22 Mar 2012 10:04
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:48

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Contributors

Author: Jenny Byrne ORCID iD
Author: Malin Ideland
Author: Claes Malmberg
Author: Marcus Grace ORCID iD

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