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A new propensity to trust scale and its relationship with individual wellbeing: implications for HRM policies and practices

A new propensity to trust scale and its relationship with individual wellbeing: implications for HRM policies and practices
A new propensity to trust scale and its relationship with individual wellbeing: implications for HRM policies and practices
In the on-going debate around HRM and performance there is an argument that greater attention should be paid to understanding the role that employee attitudes, attributes and behaviours play. Emerging research suggests that trust and well-being are two aspects that could contribute to this debate.

Research has shown some relationships between trust and well-being. However, this has tended to omit consideration of an individual’s propensity to trust due to lack of suitable measures. This paper explores the relationships between propensity to trust and well-being by means of a study of 458 managers using a newly developed instrument to assess propensity and established well-being scales. Analyses of the results demonstrated a reliable measure of propensity and a range of positive relationships. The potential implications for HR policies and practices of a measure of propensity are discussed. In particular application in the areas of selection and development are highlighted.
propensity to trust, well-being, hrm and trust
0954-5395
360-376
Ashleigh, M.J.
f2a64ca7-435b-4ad7-8db5-33b735766e46
Higgs, M.J.
bd61667f-4b7c-4caf-9d79-aee907c03ae3
Dulewicz, Victor
bed1ba8c-a8c6-4b9f-94bc-8937da615bdb
Ashleigh, M.J.
f2a64ca7-435b-4ad7-8db5-33b735766e46
Higgs, M.J.
bd61667f-4b7c-4caf-9d79-aee907c03ae3
Dulewicz, Victor
bed1ba8c-a8c6-4b9f-94bc-8937da615bdb

Ashleigh, M.J., Higgs, M.J. and Dulewicz, Victor (2012) A new propensity to trust scale and its relationship with individual wellbeing: implications for HRM policies and practices. Human Resource Management Journal, 22 (4), 360-376. (doi:10.1111/1748-8583.12007).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In the on-going debate around HRM and performance there is an argument that greater attention should be paid to understanding the role that employee attitudes, attributes and behaviours play. Emerging research suggests that trust and well-being are two aspects that could contribute to this debate.

Research has shown some relationships between trust and well-being. However, this has tended to omit consideration of an individual’s propensity to trust due to lack of suitable measures. This paper explores the relationships between propensity to trust and well-being by means of a study of 458 managers using a newly developed instrument to assess propensity and established well-being scales. Analyses of the results demonstrated a reliable measure of propensity and a range of positive relationships. The potential implications for HR policies and practices of a measure of propensity are discussed. In particular application in the areas of selection and development are highlighted.

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Published date: March 2012
Keywords: propensity to trust, well-being, hrm and trust
Organisations: HRM and Organisational Behaviour

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 336552
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/336552
ISSN: 0954-5395
PURE UUID: 9dd30781-2bdb-4924-84e8-61ac703e0df1
ORCID for M.J. Ashleigh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0583-0922

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Mar 2012 12:52
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 02:01

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Contributors

Author: M.J. Ashleigh ORCID iD
Author: M.J. Higgs
Author: Victor Dulewicz

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