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A ~9myr cycle in Cenozoic ?13C record and long-term orbital eccentricity modulation: Is there a link?

A ~9myr cycle in Cenozoic ?13C record and long-term orbital eccentricity modulation: Is there a link?
A ~9myr cycle in Cenozoic ?13C record and long-term orbital eccentricity modulation: Is there a link?
The ~ 65-myr-long Cenozoic carbon isotope record (?13C) of Zachos et al. (2001, 2008) documents a strong long-term cycle with a mean pseudoperiodicity close to ~ 9 myr. This cyclicity modulates the ~ 2.4 myr eccentricity cycle amplitude, hinting at a possible link between long-term astronomical and geological variations. Some phase shifts between ~ 9-myr ?13C and astronomical cycles suggest that additional processes (e.g., tectonics) contribute to these long-term carbon-cycle variations.

The strong response of ?13C to long-term eccentricity periods (~ 9 myr, ~ 2.4 myr, ~ 400 kyr) supports the hypothesis that the long time-residence of carbon in the oceans amplifies lower frequency or dampens higher frequency orbital variations. Additionally, the strong expression of low-amplitude ~ 9 myr eccentricity cycle in the ?13C record could be explained by energy-transfer process from higher to lower frequency cycles, and all eccentricity components modulate the carrier climatic precession cycles.

Finally, the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.9 Ma) event, which corresponds to a pronounced ?13C negative excursion, is situated within a strong decrease in the most prominent ~ 9 myr ?13C cycle, hinting at a link between accelerated rates in ?13C variations and the PETM. This specific ~ 9 myr ?13C cycle seems to be amplified by non-orbital mechanisms in atmosphere–continent–ocean system, such as previously suggested methane release from gas hydrate and volcanism.
cenozoic deep-sea ?13C records, multi-millionyear cyclicity, ~ 9 myr cyclicity, astronomical driving force, eccentricity
0012-821X
273-281
Boulila, Slah
97d222f0-c416-41f5-bbce-9b0daa5dbd7c
Galbrun, Bruno
018febc6-0aba-4a94-9d0e-4e75fa94ad3b
Laskar, Jacques
e8c93d35-c751-4939-aaa6-5288fb841415
Pälike, Heiko
b9bf7798-ad8c-479b-8487-dd9a30a61fa5
Boulila, Slah
97d222f0-c416-41f5-bbce-9b0daa5dbd7c
Galbrun, Bruno
018febc6-0aba-4a94-9d0e-4e75fa94ad3b
Laskar, Jacques
e8c93d35-c751-4939-aaa6-5288fb841415
Pälike, Heiko
b9bf7798-ad8c-479b-8487-dd9a30a61fa5

Boulila, Slah, Galbrun, Bruno, Laskar, Jacques and Pälike, Heiko (2012) A ~9myr cycle in Cenozoic ?13C record and long-term orbital eccentricity modulation: Is there a link? Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 317-318, 273-281. (doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2011.11.017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The ~ 65-myr-long Cenozoic carbon isotope record (?13C) of Zachos et al. (2001, 2008) documents a strong long-term cycle with a mean pseudoperiodicity close to ~ 9 myr. This cyclicity modulates the ~ 2.4 myr eccentricity cycle amplitude, hinting at a possible link between long-term astronomical and geological variations. Some phase shifts between ~ 9-myr ?13C and astronomical cycles suggest that additional processes (e.g., tectonics) contribute to these long-term carbon-cycle variations.

The strong response of ?13C to long-term eccentricity periods (~ 9 myr, ~ 2.4 myr, ~ 400 kyr) supports the hypothesis that the long time-residence of carbon in the oceans amplifies lower frequency or dampens higher frequency orbital variations. Additionally, the strong expression of low-amplitude ~ 9 myr eccentricity cycle in the ?13C record could be explained by energy-transfer process from higher to lower frequency cycles, and all eccentricity components modulate the carrier climatic precession cycles.

Finally, the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.9 Ma) event, which corresponds to a pronounced ?13C negative excursion, is situated within a strong decrease in the most prominent ~ 9 myr ?13C cycle, hinting at a link between accelerated rates in ?13C variations and the PETM. This specific ~ 9 myr ?13C cycle seems to be amplified by non-orbital mechanisms in atmosphere–continent–ocean system, such as previously suggested methane release from gas hydrate and volcanism.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2012
Keywords: cenozoic deep-sea ?13C records, multi-millionyear cyclicity, ~ 9 myr cyclicity, astronomical driving force, eccentricity
Organisations: Paleooceanography & Palaeoclimate

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 337013
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/337013
ISSN: 0012-821X
PURE UUID: b3cbf17c-7592-46be-8bd6-38a34fe137f2

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Apr 2012 14:31
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:05

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