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A little movement orientated to the geomagnetic field makes a big difference in strong flows

A little movement orientated to the geomagnetic field makes a big difference in strong flows
A little movement orientated to the geomagnetic field makes a big difference in strong flows
Whilst a range of animals have been shown to respond behaviourally to components of the Earth’s magnetic field, evidence of the value of this sensory perception for small animals advected by strong flows (wind/ocean currents) is equivocal. We added geomagnetic directional swimming behaviour for North Atlantic loggerhead turtle hatchlings (Caretta caretta) into a high-resolution (1/4°) global general circulation ocean model to simulate 2,925-year-long hatchling trajectories comprising 355,875 locations. A little directional swimming (1–3 h per day) had a major impact on trajectories; simulated hatchlings travelled further south into warmer water. As a result, thermal elevation of hatchling metabolic rates was estimated to be between 63.3 and 114.5% after 220 days. We show that even small animals in strong flows can benefit from geomagnetic orientation and thus the potential implications of directional swimming for other taxa may be broad.
0025-3162
481-488
Scott, Rebecca
8eec1f68-f6c5-4d2a-9dae-aee7c4e0c87a
Marsh, Robert
702c2e7e-ac19-4019-abd9-a8614ab27717
Hays, Graeme C.
b9ce7bc1-c701-4c1b-95bd-7452ed75f4ba
Scott, Rebecca
8eec1f68-f6c5-4d2a-9dae-aee7c4e0c87a
Marsh, Robert
702c2e7e-ac19-4019-abd9-a8614ab27717
Hays, Graeme C.
b9ce7bc1-c701-4c1b-95bd-7452ed75f4ba

Scott, Rebecca, Marsh, Robert and Hays, Graeme C. (2012) A little movement orientated to the geomagnetic field makes a big difference in strong flows. Marine Biology, 159 (3), 481-488. (doi:10.1007/s00227-011-1825-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Whilst a range of animals have been shown to respond behaviourally to components of the Earth’s magnetic field, evidence of the value of this sensory perception for small animals advected by strong flows (wind/ocean currents) is equivocal. We added geomagnetic directional swimming behaviour for North Atlantic loggerhead turtle hatchlings (Caretta caretta) into a high-resolution (1/4°) global general circulation ocean model to simulate 2,925-year-long hatchling trajectories comprising 355,875 locations. A little directional swimming (1–3 h per day) had a major impact on trajectories; simulated hatchlings travelled further south into warmer water. As a result, thermal elevation of hatchling metabolic rates was estimated to be between 63.3 and 114.5% after 220 days. We show that even small animals in strong flows can benefit from geomagnetic orientation and thus the potential implications of directional swimming for other taxa may be broad.

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More information

Published date: 2012
Organisations: Physical Oceanography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 337042
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/337042
ISSN: 0025-3162
PURE UUID: e9ba79af-1eee-4f3f-83a8-d62c57f00a40

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Apr 2012 13:21
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:05

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