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Macrocylic bisbibenzyl natural products and their chemical synthesis

Harrowven, David C. and Kostiuk, Sarah L. (2012) Macrocylic bisbibenzyl natural products and their chemical synthesis Natural Product Reports, 29, (2), pp. 223-242. (doi:10.1039/c1np00080b). (PMID:22089169).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The macrocyclic bisbibenzyl family of natural products are commonly found in liverworts and other bryophytes, though the recent isolation of riccardin C from a primrose extract has demonstrated their existence in higher flowering plants. Each has a core comprising four aromatic rings and two ethano-bridges, being derived in Nature from two molecules of lunularin. Sub-classes are distinguished by the connectivity between these lunularin units, while individual natural products are distinguished by the hydroxy- and/or alkoxy-substituents decorating the core structures. Further diversification results
from halogenation and oxidation, which may lead to dimerization or the creation of additional rings.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 16 November 2011
Published date: February 2012
Keywords: natural products, halogenation, oxidation, dimerization, DNA
Organisations: Organic Chemistry: Synthesis, Catalysis and Flow

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 337216
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/337216
ISSN: 0265-0568
PURE UUID: bc4cf475-949b-4398-8555-0cb2ff489737

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Apr 2012 10:25
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:04

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Contributors

Author: Sarah L. Kostiuk

University divisions

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