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The effects of adapting a writing course to students' writing strategies

The effects of adapting a writing course to students' writing strategies
The effects of adapting a writing course to students' writing strategies
Background: When writing a text, students are required to do several things simultaneously. They have to plan, translate and review, which involve demanding cognitive processes. In order to handle this complexity, writers need to develop a writing strategy. The two most well-defined writing strategies that have been identified, are those of a planning strategy and a revising strategy.

Aims: To establish whether students will be more competent in managing the complexity of writing when writing instruction is adapted to their habitual writing strategy, thus resulting in better texts.

Sample: 113 high school students (10th grade).

Method: Students were randomly assigned to either the planning or the revising condition. To identify writing strategies, students completed a questionnaire concerning their planning and revising tendencies. To measure the level of writing skill, students' texts written during pre-test and post-test were analysed.

Results: The effect of instruction based on a planning strategy interacted with the level of planning or revising strategy: the greater the use of such a strategy, the larger the effect on writing skill. In contrast, the effect of instruction based on a revising writing strategy did not interact with the level of planning or revising strategy. Results imply that students with strong tendencies to plan or revise profited from writing instruction based on a planning strategy, while students with a low tendency to plan or revise profited more from instruction based on a revising strategy.

Conclusion: Adapting writing instruction to students' level of writing strategy, is an effective approach for learning to write.
0007-0998
565-578
Kieft, Marleen
dcced6f9-70e0-4ab2-bf12-beef18f196de
Rijlaarsdam, Gert
aa6d97d2-4bc4-4d68-b0ba-acf5b02cf7f5
Galbraith, David
c4914b0d-4fd1-4127-91aa-4e8afee72ff1
Bergh, Huub
6e8f96e5-7832-4072-904d-98b1edeac599
Kieft, Marleen
dcced6f9-70e0-4ab2-bf12-beef18f196de
Rijlaarsdam, Gert
aa6d97d2-4bc4-4d68-b0ba-acf5b02cf7f5
Galbraith, David
c4914b0d-4fd1-4127-91aa-4e8afee72ff1
Bergh, Huub
6e8f96e5-7832-4072-904d-98b1edeac599

Kieft, Marleen, Rijlaarsdam, Gert, Galbraith, David and Bergh, Huub (2007) The effects of adapting a writing course to students' writing strategies. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 77 (3), 565-578. (doi:10.1348/096317906X120231).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: When writing a text, students are required to do several things simultaneously. They have to plan, translate and review, which involve demanding cognitive processes. In order to handle this complexity, writers need to develop a writing strategy. The two most well-defined writing strategies that have been identified, are those of a planning strategy and a revising strategy.

Aims: To establish whether students will be more competent in managing the complexity of writing when writing instruction is adapted to their habitual writing strategy, thus resulting in better texts.

Sample: 113 high school students (10th grade).

Method: Students were randomly assigned to either the planning or the revising condition. To identify writing strategies, students completed a questionnaire concerning their planning and revising tendencies. To measure the level of writing skill, students' texts written during pre-test and post-test were analysed.

Results: The effect of instruction based on a planning strategy interacted with the level of planning or revising strategy: the greater the use of such a strategy, the larger the effect on writing skill. In contrast, the effect of instruction based on a revising writing strategy did not interact with the level of planning or revising strategy. Results imply that students with strong tendencies to plan or revise profited from writing instruction based on a planning strategy, while students with a low tendency to plan or revise profited more from instruction based on a revising strategy.

Conclusion: Adapting writing instruction to students' level of writing strategy, is an effective approach for learning to write.

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Published date: September 2007
Organisations: Southampton Education School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 337488
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/337488
ISSN: 0007-0998
PURE UUID: 19954ef0-e8f3-4945-9af1-d277ec67200b
ORCID for David Galbraith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4195-6386

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Date deposited: 26 Apr 2012 12:33
Last modified: 25 Jul 2019 00:32

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