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The design and development of a new light-weight portable oxygen system

The design and development of a new light-weight portable oxygen system
The design and development of a new light-weight portable oxygen system
Background. Patients with respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are prescribed oxygen therapy, but frequently fail to use it as intended and therefore do not receive the associated health benefits. Many of the reasons for this non adherence to therapy relate to the design of the equipment currently provided. We have designed and developed a novel system for portable oxygen delivery to overcome this problem.

Method of approach. There were five complementary workpackages (User involvement and exploratory work; Ultra lightweight cylinder technology; Embedded valve regulator technology; Patient-driven system design; Regulatory design & manufacturing review). Each had specific deliverables supporting the end point of the programme, i.e. to have a fully functioning prototype oxygen delivery system that had been designed and evaluated with maximum input from end users.

Results. Patients primarily wanted a lightweight, long lasting, reliable, unobtrusive and ergonomically designed system with simple controls. To provide this, we have developed a new full wrap composite cylinder that has achieved weight savings of ~12% over a comparative composite cylinder, and a doubling in cylinder design life. We have developed a totally new concept in valve regulator technology, conferring significant reductions in weight and space envelope. We have addressed form factor, flow dial design and flow setting indicator design to improve the ergonomics and aesthetics of the system. The developed prototype system weighs 1.7 kg when full, is 34.2cm in height and 8.5-8.7cm in diameter, and is capable of 8 hours operation at a flow rate of 2 litres per minute, using a standard conserver.

Conclusions. Throughout this project, a significant amount of time was invested in establishing the views and perceptions of potential end-users of the new system. This has ensured that their views informed the design and development process. By combining novel cylinder technology with revolutionary valve technology we have been able to design an ultra-light cylinder oxygen system with accurate, reliable and stable flow. The weight reduction combined with the new easy-to-read gauge and user-friendly controls should improve patient confidence in the system and result in increased adherence to therapy.
1932-6181
31007
Bruton, Anne
9f8b6076-6558-4d99-b7c8-72b03796ed95
Sinclair, Ian
6005f6c1-f478-434e-a52d-d310c18ade0d
Arnold, Elizabeth
fbbd648a-07f3-48ba-9677-ddc0450e338f
Hepples, Warren
2ef2a0f5-159e-4601-b48f-81d015fa9381
Kay, Francis
4ebeba76-3f53-4a70-93a4-b2fd114af6f6
Maisey, Graeme
d24243df-2d6c-44b9-adc5-96cb6767e390
Norwood, Andy
4733c67f-c653-4de4-98a6-3f0b7f0d3ca5
Clinch, Mike
fd21ff8f-e486-4864-9b88-41ee75818ffe
Bruton, Anne
9f8b6076-6558-4d99-b7c8-72b03796ed95
Sinclair, Ian
6005f6c1-f478-434e-a52d-d310c18ade0d
Arnold, Elizabeth
fbbd648a-07f3-48ba-9677-ddc0450e338f
Hepples, Warren
2ef2a0f5-159e-4601-b48f-81d015fa9381
Kay, Francis
4ebeba76-3f53-4a70-93a4-b2fd114af6f6
Maisey, Graeme
d24243df-2d6c-44b9-adc5-96cb6767e390
Norwood, Andy
4733c67f-c653-4de4-98a6-3f0b7f0d3ca5
Clinch, Mike
fd21ff8f-e486-4864-9b88-41ee75818ffe

Bruton, Anne, Sinclair, Ian, Arnold, Elizabeth, Hepples, Warren, Kay, Francis, Maisey, Graeme, Norwood, Andy and Clinch, Mike (2012) The design and development of a new light-weight portable oxygen system. Journal of Medical Devices, 6 (3), 31007. (doi:10.1115/1.4007180).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background. Patients with respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are prescribed oxygen therapy, but frequently fail to use it as intended and therefore do not receive the associated health benefits. Many of the reasons for this non adherence to therapy relate to the design of the equipment currently provided. We have designed and developed a novel system for portable oxygen delivery to overcome this problem.

Method of approach. There were five complementary workpackages (User involvement and exploratory work; Ultra lightweight cylinder technology; Embedded valve regulator technology; Patient-driven system design; Regulatory design & manufacturing review). Each had specific deliverables supporting the end point of the programme, i.e. to have a fully functioning prototype oxygen delivery system that had been designed and evaluated with maximum input from end users.

Results. Patients primarily wanted a lightweight, long lasting, reliable, unobtrusive and ergonomically designed system with simple controls. To provide this, we have developed a new full wrap composite cylinder that has achieved weight savings of ~12% over a comparative composite cylinder, and a doubling in cylinder design life. We have developed a totally new concept in valve regulator technology, conferring significant reductions in weight and space envelope. We have addressed form factor, flow dial design and flow setting indicator design to improve the ergonomics and aesthetics of the system. The developed prototype system weighs 1.7 kg when full, is 34.2cm in height and 8.5-8.7cm in diameter, and is capable of 8 hours operation at a flow rate of 2 litres per minute, using a standard conserver.

Conclusions. Throughout this project, a significant amount of time was invested in establishing the views and perceptions of potential end-users of the new system. This has ensured that their views informed the design and development process. By combining novel cylinder technology with revolutionary valve technology we have been able to design an ultra-light cylinder oxygen system with accurate, reliable and stable flow. The weight reduction combined with the new easy-to-read gauge and user-friendly controls should improve patient confidence in the system and result in increased adherence to therapy.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 May 2012
Published date: September 2012
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 337674
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/337674
ISSN: 1932-6181
PURE UUID: c9eab295-b04e-4b8d-b2af-3641881330b3
ORCID for Anne Bruton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4550-2536

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 May 2012 10:40
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:04

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Contributors

Author: Anne Bruton ORCID iD
Author: Ian Sinclair
Author: Elizabeth Arnold
Author: Warren Hepples
Author: Francis Kay
Author: Graeme Maisey
Author: Andy Norwood
Author: Mike Clinch

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