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Family centres: In the settlement tradition?

Family centres: In the settlement tradition?
Family centres: In the settlement tradition?
Reflecting the current emphasis in social care, social policy and welfare on the ideas of community and active citizenship, this book draws implications from the history of the settlement movement in Britain and the States which will inform and contextualise contemporary practice and policy.
The contributors to this illuminating book develop the basic settlement concepts of strong communities and links across groups with different kinds of need, and apply them to current policy developments in community responsibility, the role of voluntary work and the future of social care. The issues explored through the history of the settlement movement are not only applicable to practice; they will also reinforce the identity of social care as a profession.
1853027642
194-213
Jessica Kingsley Publishers
Cannan, Crescy
dcb6f81a-b3b0-42ce-bfaa-351a661f832a
Warren-Adamson, Chris
be1b110b-14b5-431d-86bc-b6f81976662e
Gilchrist, Ruth
Jeffs, Tony
Cannan, Crescy
dcb6f81a-b3b0-42ce-bfaa-351a661f832a
Warren-Adamson, Chris
be1b110b-14b5-431d-86bc-b6f81976662e
Gilchrist, Ruth
Jeffs, Tony

Cannan, Crescy and Warren-Adamson, Chris (2001) Family centres: In the settlement tradition? In, Gilchrist, Ruth and Jeffs, Tony (eds.) Settlements, Social Change & Community Action. Good Neighbours. London, UK. Jessica Kingsley Publishers, pp. 194-213.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Reflecting the current emphasis in social care, social policy and welfare on the ideas of community and active citizenship, this book draws implications from the history of the settlement movement in Britain and the States which will inform and contextualise contemporary practice and policy.
The contributors to this illuminating book develop the basic settlement concepts of strong communities and links across groups with different kinds of need, and apply them to current policy developments in community responsibility, the role of voluntary work and the future of social care. The issues explored through the history of the settlement movement are not only applicable to practice; they will also reinforce the identity of social care as a profession.

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Published date: 2001

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 33776
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/33776
ISBN: 1853027642
PURE UUID: 39a3d705-4f06-4a5a-b5dc-a999290f7088

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Date deposited: 19 May 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 15:52

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Contributors

Author: Crescy Cannan
Author: Chris Warren-Adamson
Editor: Ruth Gilchrist
Editor: Tony Jeffs

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