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Bacterial tracheitis: a multi-centre perspective

Bacterial tracheitis: a multi-centre perspective
Bacterial tracheitis: a multi-centre perspective
The published literature on bacterial tracheitis is limited. We report the first multi-centre study of bacterial tracheitis together with a concise review of the literature. We conducted a retrospective study of cases admitted during the period 1993–2007 to 3 tertiary paediatric centres in the United Kingdom and 1 in Australia. A total of 34 cases were identified. 31 patients (91%) required intubation. Complications included cardiorespiratory arrest in 1, ARDS in 1, hypotension in 10, toxic shock syndrome in 1 and renal failure in 1 patient(s). Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly implicated bacterial organism, isolated from the respiratory tract in 55.8% of the cases overall. Other pathogens commonly isolated from the respiratory tract included Streptococcus pyogenes (5.9%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (11.8%) and Haemophilus influenzae (11.8%). Viral coinfection was identified in 9 (31%) of the 29 cases in whom immunofluorescence testing was performed (influenza A in 4 cases; parainfluenza 1 in 2 cases; parainfluenza 3 in 2 cases; adenovirus in 1 case). The combined experience from 4 major paediatric intensive care units suggests that bacterial tracheitis remains a rare condition with an estimated incidence of approximately 0.1/100,000 children per year. Short-term complications were common but long-term sequelae were rare. There were no fatal outcomes, which contrasts with the high historical mortality rates and likely reflects improvements in intensive care management.

Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00365540902913478
0036-5548
548-557
Tebruegge, M.
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Pantazidou, A.
72cf8be4-5c01-4a73-87db-68d4089175b0
Thorburn, K.
5fda1953-05fe-40ec-a935-606a104d3a0c
Riordan, A.
242601d6-0689-4da3-af03-f235362842d7
Round, J.
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De Munter, C.
af775d32-1e6e-4bd6-ace0-ad6818b1efd7
Walters, S.
a41917a7-b610-47ba-b21f-e1f3c0d835e9
Tebruegge, M.
2c3dff22-0b5f-48a7-bb36-ce323705f74a
Pantazidou, A.
72cf8be4-5c01-4a73-87db-68d4089175b0
Thorburn, K.
5fda1953-05fe-40ec-a935-606a104d3a0c
Riordan, A.
242601d6-0689-4da3-af03-f235362842d7
Round, J.
7fb69a0a-bf8e-4929-951c-55b3a3e73235
De Munter, C.
af775d32-1e6e-4bd6-ace0-ad6818b1efd7
Walters, S.
a41917a7-b610-47ba-b21f-e1f3c0d835e9

Tebruegge, M., Pantazidou, A., Thorburn, K., Riordan, A., Round, J., De Munter, C. and Walters, S. (2009) Bacterial tracheitis: a multi-centre perspective. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 41 (8), 548-557. (doi:10.1080/00365540902913478). (PMID:19401934)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The published literature on bacterial tracheitis is limited. We report the first multi-centre study of bacterial tracheitis together with a concise review of the literature. We conducted a retrospective study of cases admitted during the period 1993–2007 to 3 tertiary paediatric centres in the United Kingdom and 1 in Australia. A total of 34 cases were identified. 31 patients (91%) required intubation. Complications included cardiorespiratory arrest in 1, ARDS in 1, hypotension in 10, toxic shock syndrome in 1 and renal failure in 1 patient(s). Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly implicated bacterial organism, isolated from the respiratory tract in 55.8% of the cases overall. Other pathogens commonly isolated from the respiratory tract included Streptococcus pyogenes (5.9%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (11.8%) and Haemophilus influenzae (11.8%). Viral coinfection was identified in 9 (31%) of the 29 cases in whom immunofluorescence testing was performed (influenza A in 4 cases; parainfluenza 1 in 2 cases; parainfluenza 3 in 2 cases; adenovirus in 1 case). The combined experience from 4 major paediatric intensive care units suggests that bacterial tracheitis remains a rare condition with an estimated incidence of approximately 0.1/100,000 children per year. Short-term complications were common but long-term sequelae were rare. There were no fatal outcomes, which contrasts with the high historical mortality rates and likely reflects improvements in intensive care management.

Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00365540902913478

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Published date: March 2009
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 338172
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/338172
ISSN: 0036-5548
PURE UUID: 993cea87-4219-4e96-9463-c39ef4b5a14f

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Date deposited: 10 May 2012 13:06
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:58

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Contributors

Author: M. Tebruegge
Author: A. Pantazidou
Author: K. Thorburn
Author: A. Riordan
Author: J. Round
Author: C. De Munter
Author: S. Walters

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