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Growing taller, living longer? anthropometric history and the future of old age

Harris, Bernard (1997) Growing taller, living longer? anthropometric history and the future of old age Ageing & Society, 17, (5), pp. 491-512. (doi:10.1017/S0144686X97006594).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In recent years, economic and social historians have made increasing use of anthropometric records (principally, records of human height and weight) to investigate changes in human health and well-being. This paper summarises some of the main findings of this research and demonstrates the remarkable increases in human height which have occurred during the course of the present century. The paper also examines the relationship between changes in average height and changes in life expectancy. Although most of the evidence assembled by anthropometric historians has been derived from records relating to schoolchildren and young adults, their work has profound implications for the study of health in old age. The concluding section examines the relevance of this work to current debates on the decline of mortality, the ‘compression of morbidity’ and the future of social policy.

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More information

Published date: 1997
Keywords: anthropometry, health, height, old age, longevity
Organisations: Sociology & Social Policy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 33864
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/33864
ISSN: 0144-686X
PURE UUID: 4f65b2f4-653a-44b3-9893-f7f55a43c4a7

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Dec 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 15:51

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