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Does maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status in pregnancy influence the bone health of children?

Does maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status in pregnancy influence the bone health of children?
Does maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status in pregnancy influence the bone health of children?
In this large, population-based, prospective, mother-offspring cohort study, maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status during pregnancy was found to be positively associated with bone mass in the offspring at age 4 years. The findings suggest that variation in intrauterine exposure to n-3 and n-6 LCPUFAs may have potential consequences for skeletal development.

Introduction: Maternal diet in pregnancy has been linked to childhood bone mass, but the mechanisms and nutrients involved are uncertain. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) have been shown to affect bone metabolism, but the relationship between maternal fatty acid status and bone mass in the offspring remains unknown.

Methods: We evaluated the association between maternal LCPUFA status in late pregnancy (34 weeks gestation) and bone density in their children at age 4 years within 727 mother-child pairs taking part in the Southampton Women's Survey.

Results: Concentrations of the n-3 LCPUFA component of maternal plasma phosphatidylcholine were positively associated with a number of bone mineral measures at the age of 4 years; these associations persisted after adjustment for maternal body build, walking speed and infant feeding. Relationships were most evident for eicosapentaenoic acid (r?=?0.09, p?=?0.02 for whole body areal bone mineral density [aBMD] and r?=?0.1, p?=?0.008 for lumbar spine aBMD) and for docosapentaenoic acid (r?=?0.09, p?=?0.02 for whole body aBMD and r?=?0.12, p?=?0.002 for lumbar spine aBMD).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that variation in early exposure to n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA may have potential consequences for bone development and that the effects appear to persist into early childhood.
bone mass, development, epidemiology, nutrition, osteoporosis
0937-941X
2359-2367
Harvey, N.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Dhanwal, D.
f2b25481-4e2e-40fb-89ac-6b3cd076bd52
Robinson, S.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Kim, M.
c2e4ad50-0a64-4da9-8335-78531d88e93d
Inskip, H.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, K.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Dennison, E.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Calder, P.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, N.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Dhanwal, D.
f2b25481-4e2e-40fb-89ac-6b3cd076bd52
Robinson, S.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Kim, M.
c2e4ad50-0a64-4da9-8335-78531d88e93d
Inskip, H.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, K.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Dennison, E.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Calder, P.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6

Harvey, N., Dhanwal, D., Robinson, S., Kim, M., Inskip, H., Godfrey, K., Dennison, E., Calder, P. and Cooper, C. (2012) Does maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status in pregnancy influence the bone health of children? Osteoporosis International, 23, (9), pp. 2359-2367. (PMID:22159749).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this large, population-based, prospective, mother-offspring cohort study, maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status during pregnancy was found to be positively associated with bone mass in the offspring at age 4 years. The findings suggest that variation in intrauterine exposure to n-3 and n-6 LCPUFAs may have potential consequences for skeletal development.

Introduction: Maternal diet in pregnancy has been linked to childhood bone mass, but the mechanisms and nutrients involved are uncertain. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) have been shown to affect bone metabolism, but the relationship between maternal fatty acid status and bone mass in the offspring remains unknown.

Methods: We evaluated the association between maternal LCPUFA status in late pregnancy (34 weeks gestation) and bone density in their children at age 4 years within 727 mother-child pairs taking part in the Southampton Women's Survey.

Results: Concentrations of the n-3 LCPUFA component of maternal plasma phosphatidylcholine were positively associated with a number of bone mineral measures at the age of 4 years; these associations persisted after adjustment for maternal body build, walking speed and infant feeding. Relationships were most evident for eicosapentaenoic acid (r?=?0.09, p?=?0.02 for whole body areal bone mineral density [aBMD] and r?=?0.1, p?=?0.008 for lumbar spine aBMD) and for docosapentaenoic acid (r?=?0.09, p?=?0.02 for whole body aBMD and r?=?0.12, p?=?0.002 for lumbar spine aBMD).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that variation in early exposure to n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA may have potential consequences for bone development and that the effects appear to persist into early childhood.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: November 2011
Published date: September 2012
Keywords: bone mass, development, epidemiology, nutrition, osteoporosis
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 338813
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/338813
ISSN: 0937-941X
PURE UUID: af0296e3-cabc-4d25-b8ba-141fefb7f32d
ORCID for S. Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269
ORCID for H. Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for K. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 May 2012 12:33
Last modified: 28 Aug 2017 21:29

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Contributors

Author: N. Harvey
Author: D. Dhanwal
Author: S. Robinson ORCID iD
Author: M. Kim
Author: H. Inskip ORCID iD
Author: K. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: E. Dennison
Author: P. Calder
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD

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