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Co-digestion of source segregated domestic food waste to improve process stability

Co-digestion of source segregated domestic food waste to improve process stability
Co-digestion of source segregated domestic food waste to improve process stability
Cattle slurry and card packaging were used to improve the operational stability of food waste digestion, with the aim of reducing digestate total ammoniacal nitrogen concentrations compared to food waste only. Use of cattle slurry could have major environmental benefits through reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with current management practices; whilst card packaging is closely linked to food waste and could be co-collected as a source segregated material. Both options increase the renewable energy potential whilst retaining organic matter and nutrients for soil replenishment. Co-digestion allowed higher organic loadings and gave a more stable process. A high ammonia inoculum acclimated more readily to cattle slurry than card packaging, probably through supplementation by trace elements and micro-organisms. Long-term operation at a 75-litre scale showed a characteristic pattern of volatile fatty acid accumulation in mono-digestion of food waste, and allowed performance parameters to be determined for the co-digestion substrates.
food waste, card packaging, cattle slurry, ammonia, specific methane production
0960-8524
168-178
Zhang, Yue
69b11d32-d555-46e4-a333-88eee4628ae7
Banks, Charles J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Heaven, Sonia
f25f74b6-97bd-4a18-b33b-a63084718571
Zhang, Yue
69b11d32-d555-46e4-a333-88eee4628ae7
Banks, Charles J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Heaven, Sonia
f25f74b6-97bd-4a18-b33b-a63084718571

Zhang, Yue, Banks, Charles J. and Heaven, Sonia (2012) Co-digestion of source segregated domestic food waste to improve process stability. Bioresource Technology, 114, 168-178. (doi:10.1016/j.biortech.2012.03.040).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cattle slurry and card packaging were used to improve the operational stability of food waste digestion, with the aim of reducing digestate total ammoniacal nitrogen concentrations compared to food waste only. Use of cattle slurry could have major environmental benefits through reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with current management practices; whilst card packaging is closely linked to food waste and could be co-collected as a source segregated material. Both options increase the renewable energy potential whilst retaining organic matter and nutrients for soil replenishment. Co-digestion allowed higher organic loadings and gave a more stable process. A high ammonia inoculum acclimated more readily to cattle slurry than card packaging, probably through supplementation by trace elements and micro-organisms. Long-term operation at a 75-litre scale showed a characteristic pattern of volatile fatty acid accumulation in mono-digestion of food waste, and allowed performance parameters to be determined for the co-digestion substrates.

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Co-digestion_of_source_segregated_domestic_food_waste_to_improve_process_stability___Zhang_et_al,_scholar_text.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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e-pub ahead of print date: 19 March 2012
Published date: June 2012
Keywords: food waste, card packaging, cattle slurry, ammonia, specific methane production
Organisations: Centre for Environmental Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 338998
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/338998
ISSN: 0960-8524
PURE UUID: 61003c5e-1a21-409a-97b9-eff2e8a61f6f
ORCID for Yue Zhang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5068-2260
ORCID for Sonia Heaven: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7798-4683

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 May 2012 13:54
Last modified: 17 Mar 2020 01:25

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Contributors

Author: Yue Zhang ORCID iD
Author: Sonia Heaven ORCID iD

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