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A cryogenic dc-dc power converter for a 100kW synchronous HTS generator at liquid nitrogen temperatures

A cryogenic dc-dc power converter for a 100kW synchronous HTS generator at liquid nitrogen temperatures
A cryogenic dc-dc power converter for a 100kW synchronous HTS generator at liquid nitrogen temperatures
A dc-dc converter has been developed for retrofitting inside the vacuum space of the HTS rotor of a synchronous generator. The heavy copper sections of the current leads used for energising the HTS field winding were replaced by cryogenic power electronics; consisting of the converter and a rotor control unit. The converter board was designed using an H-bridge configuration with two 5A rated wires connecting the cryogenic boards to the stator control board located on the outside of the generator and drawing power from a (5A, 50V) dc power source. The robustness of converter board was well demonstrated when it was powered up from a cold start at 82K. When charging the field winding with moderate currents (30A), the heat in-leak to the ‘cold’ rotor core was only 2W. It continued to function down to 74K, surviving several quenches. However, the quench protection function failed when injecting 75A into the field winding, resulting in the burn out of one of the DC-link capacitors. The magnitudes of the critical currents measured with the original current leads were compared to the quench currents, which was defined as the current which triggered quench protection protocol. The difference between the two currents was rather large, (~20A). However, additional measurements using a single HTS coil in liquid nitrogen found that this reduction should not be so dramatic and in the region of 4A. Our conclusions identified the converter’s switching voltage and its operating frequency as two parameters, which could have contributed to lowering the quench current. Magnetic fields and eddy currents are expected to be more prominent the field winding and its impact on the converter also need further investigation.
0921-4534
Bailey, W.O.S.
c356b2e3-a783-4b4c-8c7b-521696d3b37c
Yang, Y.
0c661323-7e23-41c6-a9a2-b4479fd74ef1
Forsyth, A.
5dc2d24c-e10d-4741-8d3d-b733cd15dab9
Jia, C.
b8c7c074-5671-473c-a2c2-b83379954c83
Bailey, W.O.S.
c356b2e3-a783-4b4c-8c7b-521696d3b37c
Yang, Y.
0c661323-7e23-41c6-a9a2-b4479fd74ef1
Forsyth, A.
5dc2d24c-e10d-4741-8d3d-b733cd15dab9
Jia, C.
b8c7c074-5671-473c-a2c2-b83379954c83

Bailey, W.O.S., Yang, Y., Forsyth, A. and Jia, C. (2012) A cryogenic dc-dc power converter for a 100kW synchronous HTS generator at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Physica C: Superconductivity And its Applications.

Record type: Article

Abstract

A dc-dc converter has been developed for retrofitting inside the vacuum space of the HTS rotor of a synchronous generator. The heavy copper sections of the current leads used for energising the HTS field winding were replaced by cryogenic power electronics; consisting of the converter and a rotor control unit. The converter board was designed using an H-bridge configuration with two 5A rated wires connecting the cryogenic boards to the stator control board located on the outside of the generator and drawing power from a (5A, 50V) dc power source. The robustness of converter board was well demonstrated when it was powered up from a cold start at 82K. When charging the field winding with moderate currents (30A), the heat in-leak to the ‘cold’ rotor core was only 2W. It continued to function down to 74K, surviving several quenches. However, the quench protection function failed when injecting 75A into the field winding, resulting in the burn out of one of the DC-link capacitors. The magnitudes of the critical currents measured with the original current leads were compared to the quench currents, which was defined as the current which triggered quench protection protocol. The difference between the two currents was rather large, (~20A). However, additional measurements using a single HTS coil in liquid nitrogen found that this reduction should not be so dramatic and in the region of 4A. Our conclusions identified the converter’s switching voltage and its operating frequency as two parameters, which could have contributed to lowering the quench current. Magnetic fields and eddy currents are expected to be more prominent the field winding and its impact on the converter also need further investigation.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: May 2012
Published date: 2012
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 339061
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/339061
ISSN: 0921-4534
PURE UUID: 48b8da65-4baa-4572-ad37-47049435d5f0

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2012 12:33
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:55

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Contributors

Author: W.O.S. Bailey
Author: Y. Yang
Author: A. Forsyth
Author: C. Jia

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