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Pressure ulcers and incontinence-associated dermatitis: effectiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Classification education tool on classification by nurses

Pressure ulcers and incontinence-associated dermatitis: effectiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Classification education tool on classification by nurses
Pressure ulcers and incontinence-associated dermatitis: effectiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Classification education tool on classification by nurses
Context: previous studies report that pressure ulcer classification and differentiation from incontinence associated dermatitis are difficult. Incorrect classification and differentiation result in incorrect prevention and treatment. Education is important to spread evidence-based insights about this topic and to improve classification skills.

Aim: to assess the effectiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Classification (PUCLAS) education tool. PUCLAS was developed by the PUCLAS Workgroup of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel.

Design: randomised controlled trial.

Setting and participants: a convenience sample of 1217 Belgian, Dutch, British and Portuguese nurses.

Outcome measure: correct classification of pressure ulcer photographs and differentiation from photographs of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

Results: baseline, 44.5% of the photographs were classified correctly. In the post-test, the results in the intervention group were significantly higher (63.2%) compared with the control group (53.1%; p<0.001). The percentage of correct assessments of incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) was 70.7% in the intervention group and 35.6% in the control group (p<0.001). The skill to differentiate IAD from pressure ulcers was significantly associated with the experimental intervention (OR 4.07, 95% CI 3.21 to 5.15, p<0.001).

Conclusion: the PUCLAS tool improved pressure ulcer classification and IAD differentiation significantly
1-4
Beeckman, Dimitri
1ead183b-0e82-4b3f-864b-8dfc2e58de3e
Schoonhoven, Lisette
46a2705b-c657-409b-b9da-329d5b1b02de
Fletcher, Jacqui
48f8edda-a9e9-4951-833d-feddbe21db9b
Furtado, Katia
b4d554f1-60d1-44a6-a85f-54c19e41ba89
Heyman, Hilde
b9d20d9d-8839-4a90-baba-fa6f1666b4c9
Paquay, Louis
d7187a85-73aa-4c5e-bfe9-f1a9f3766c08
de Bacquer, Dirk
46d4b98c-919d-4efb-9b3f-1b545336c87d
Defloor, Tom
51beda91-f7d4-48c0-adb1-491e6f1c6492
Beeckman, Dimitri
1ead183b-0e82-4b3f-864b-8dfc2e58de3e
Schoonhoven, Lisette
46a2705b-c657-409b-b9da-329d5b1b02de
Fletcher, Jacqui
48f8edda-a9e9-4951-833d-feddbe21db9b
Furtado, Katia
b4d554f1-60d1-44a6-a85f-54c19e41ba89
Heyman, Hilde
b9d20d9d-8839-4a90-baba-fa6f1666b4c9
Paquay, Louis
d7187a85-73aa-4c5e-bfe9-f1a9f3766c08
de Bacquer, Dirk
46d4b98c-919d-4efb-9b3f-1b545336c87d
Defloor, Tom
51beda91-f7d4-48c0-adb1-491e6f1c6492

Beeckman, Dimitri, Schoonhoven, Lisette, Fletcher, Jacqui, Furtado, Katia, Heyman, Hilde, Paquay, Louis, de Bacquer, Dirk and Defloor, Tom (2010) Pressure ulcers and incontinence-associated dermatitis: effectiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Classification education tool on classification by nurses. BMJ Quality and Safety, 19, 1-4. (doi:10.1136/qshc.2008.028415). (PMID:20671078)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Context: previous studies report that pressure ulcer classification and differentiation from incontinence associated dermatitis are difficult. Incorrect classification and differentiation result in incorrect prevention and treatment. Education is important to spread evidence-based insights about this topic and to improve classification skills.

Aim: to assess the effectiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Classification (PUCLAS) education tool. PUCLAS was developed by the PUCLAS Workgroup of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel.

Design: randomised controlled trial.

Setting and participants: a convenience sample of 1217 Belgian, Dutch, British and Portuguese nurses.

Outcome measure: correct classification of pressure ulcer photographs and differentiation from photographs of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

Results: baseline, 44.5% of the photographs were classified correctly. In the post-test, the results in the intervention group were significantly higher (63.2%) compared with the control group (53.1%; p<0.001). The percentage of correct assessments of incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) was 70.7% in the intervention group and 35.6% in the control group (p<0.001). The skill to differentiate IAD from pressure ulcers was significantly associated with the experimental intervention (OR 4.07, 95% CI 3.21 to 5.15, p<0.001).

Conclusion: the PUCLAS tool improved pressure ulcer classification and IAD differentiation significantly

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 29 July 2010
Published date: October 2010
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 339214
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/339214
PURE UUID: 6d53e16b-23eb-41c1-951a-9ad53fb21d46
ORCID for Lisette Schoonhoven: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7129-3766

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Date deposited: 25 May 2012 09:34
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:30

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Contributors

Author: Dimitri Beeckman
Author: Jacqui Fletcher
Author: Katia Furtado
Author: Hilde Heyman
Author: Louis Paquay
Author: Dirk de Bacquer
Author: Tom Defloor

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