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The influence of attraction flow on upstream passage of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) at intertidal barriers

The influence of attraction flow on upstream passage of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) at intertidal barriers
The influence of attraction flow on upstream passage of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) at intertidal barriers
River structures can delay or prevent upstream migration of the critically endangered European eel Anguilla anguilla (L.). Eel ladders are frequently installed to mitigate for the impacts of barriers. There has been little quantitative testing to optimise attraction to pass facilities. The effect of plunging and streaming flow on pass efficiency was tested within field trials using four eel ladders at an intertidal weir with little seaward freshwater discharge. Eel passage was 2 fold higher in the presence of plunging flow. Water temperature and height of tide were also significant factors influencing daily catch. A strong ‘edge effect’ influenced route choice, with greatest catches in traps positioned at the channel sides. Route choice was related to body size with largest size classes (>121 mm) mostly passing towards the centre of the channel. The findings show that simple manipulation of hydrodynamic conditions at the entrance to upstream eel passes can improve passage efficiency for both juvenile and adult life-stages.
eel ladder, fish pass, upstream migration, hydrodynamics, weirs, tidal barrier
0925-8574
329-336
Piper, Adam T.
03898caa-b880-4200-9406-a521a74dc6f7
Wright, Rosalind M.
d2608e88-f522-44ed-b58e-bad60c522f23
Kemp, Paul S.
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7
Piper, Adam T.
03898caa-b880-4200-9406-a521a74dc6f7
Wright, Rosalind M.
d2608e88-f522-44ed-b58e-bad60c522f23
Kemp, Paul S.
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7

Piper, Adam T., Wright, Rosalind M. and Kemp, Paul S. (2012) The influence of attraction flow on upstream passage of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) at intertidal barriers. Ecological Engineering, 44, 329-336. (doi:10.1016/j.ecoleng.2012.04.019).

Record type: Article

Abstract

River structures can delay or prevent upstream migration of the critically endangered European eel Anguilla anguilla (L.). Eel ladders are frequently installed to mitigate for the impacts of barriers. There has been little quantitative testing to optimise attraction to pass facilities. The effect of plunging and streaming flow on pass efficiency was tested within field trials using four eel ladders at an intertidal weir with little seaward freshwater discharge. Eel passage was 2 fold higher in the presence of plunging flow. Water temperature and height of tide were also significant factors influencing daily catch. A strong ‘edge effect’ influenced route choice, with greatest catches in traps positioned at the channel sides. Route choice was related to body size with largest size classes (>121 mm) mostly passing towards the centre of the channel. The findings show that simple manipulation of hydrodynamic conditions at the entrance to upstream eel passes can improve passage efficiency for both juvenile and adult life-stages.

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More information

Published date: 5 May 2012
Keywords: eel ladder, fish pass, upstream migration, hydrodynamics, weirs, tidal barrier
Organisations: Centre for Environmental Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 339725
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/339725
ISSN: 0925-8574
PURE UUID: ba3602fc-7820-4de7-86f7-bfc047fa0254
ORCID for Paul S. Kemp: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4470-0589

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 May 2012 12:37
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:47

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