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Fertility transitions: do countries follow a common pathway?

Fertility transitions: do countries follow a common pathway?
Fertility transitions: do countries follow a common pathway?
Fertility decline has long been underway in most countries, at least in certain subgroups of the population. However, while some developing countries have reached a state of low fertility, others have stalled in their fertility decline. This paper proposes a pathway by which countries transition from high to low fertility, focusing on fertility by wealth and place of residence. Using DHS data from 28 countries that have three or more surveys over a ten year period, total fertility rates are calculated by wealth quintile and place of residence. Wealth quintiles are calculated for urban and rural areas separately to provide a measure that more accurately captures asset wealth in the two areas. It is seen that there are substantial commonalities between countries in transitions over time, with fertility for the urban rich falling first and fastest, while the rural poor are the last to experience any fertility change. The results support the proposed fertility transition pathway and highlight groups in the population that are responsible for stalled fertility decline
Channon, Andrew A.R.
5a60607c-6861-4960-a81d-504169d5880c
Frost, Melanie Dawn
3b24e5c1-dae8-43d0-92e1-de4411263e47
Channon, Andrew A.R.
5a60607c-6861-4960-a81d-504169d5880c
Frost, Melanie Dawn
3b24e5c1-dae8-43d0-92e1-de4411263e47

Channon, Andrew A.R. and Frost, Melanie Dawn (2010) Fertility transitions: do countries follow a common pathway? British Society for Population Studies Annual Conference, United Kingdom. 13 - 15 Sep 2010.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Fertility decline has long been underway in most countries, at least in certain subgroups of the population. However, while some developing countries have reached a state of low fertility, others have stalled in their fertility decline. This paper proposes a pathway by which countries transition from high to low fertility, focusing on fertility by wealth and place of residence. Using DHS data from 28 countries that have three or more surveys over a ten year period, total fertility rates are calculated by wealth quintile and place of residence. Wealth quintiles are calculated for urban and rural areas separately to provide a measure that more accurately captures asset wealth in the two areas. It is seen that there are substantial commonalities between countries in transitions over time, with fertility for the urban rich falling first and fastest, while the rural poor are the last to experience any fertility change. The results support the proposed fertility transition pathway and highlight groups in the population that are responsible for stalled fertility decline

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More information

Published date: 13 September 2010
Venue - Dates: British Society for Population Studies Annual Conference, United Kingdom, 2010-09-13 - 2010-09-15
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 339816
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/339816
PURE UUID: 1589798c-b879-42a5-b442-429550ab588e
ORCID for Andrew A.R. Channon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4855-0418

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 May 2012 10:15
Last modified: 24 Jul 2019 00:35

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