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Drifting on and off-line: humanising the cyber criminal

Drifting on and off-line: humanising the cyber criminal
Drifting on and off-line: humanising the cyber criminal
Technological change represents one of the clearest areas in which criminology has had to work hard to keep-up. In this chapter Webber and Yip provide a cutting edge analysis of a particular kind of cybercrime, carding, and use online forums as a means of investigating the mechanisms and culture of hackers working in this illicit economy. Using this data they develop ideas taken from criminological theory to suggest that hackers operate within disorganised fields in which association with others allows hackers to learn how to operate effectively. In contrast to the sterility of much web crime analysis the authors use their data to highlight some of the more complex aspects of hacker identity and the conflicts that sometimes emerge around the relative morality of their actions.
978-0-415-62649-1
191-205
Routledge
Webber, Craig
35851bbe-83e6-4c9b-9dd2-cdf1f60c245d
Yip, Michael
78566995-aa68-4842-976b-cd98c98d8c67
Winlow, Simon
Atkinson, Rowland
Webber, Craig
35851bbe-83e6-4c9b-9dd2-cdf1f60c245d
Yip, Michael
78566995-aa68-4842-976b-cd98c98d8c67
Winlow, Simon
Atkinson, Rowland

Webber, Craig and Yip, Michael (2012) Drifting on and off-line: humanising the cyber criminal. In, Winlow, Simon and Atkinson, Rowland (eds.) New Directions in Crime and Deviancy. Abingdon, GB. Routledge, pp. 191-205.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Technological change represents one of the clearest areas in which criminology has had to work hard to keep-up. In this chapter Webber and Yip provide a cutting edge analysis of a particular kind of cybercrime, carding, and use online forums as a means of investigating the mechanisms and culture of hackers working in this illicit economy. Using this data they develop ideas taken from criminological theory to suggest that hackers operate within disorganised fields in which association with others allows hackers to learn how to operate effectively. In contrast to the sterility of much web crime analysis the authors use their data to highlight some of the more complex aspects of hacker identity and the conflicts that sometimes emerge around the relative morality of their actions.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 28 November 2012
Organisations: Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology, Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 339856
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/339856
ISBN: 978-0-415-62649-1
PURE UUID: 0299d19e-a4b0-477a-b119-6d75d66c29d5
ORCID for Craig Webber: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3900-7579

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 May 2012 13:43
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:55

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