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Optical characterisation of germanium optical fibres

Optical characterisation of germanium optical fibres
Optical characterisation of germanium optical fibres
Semiconductor core optical fibres are currently generating great interest as they promise to be a platform for the seamless incorporation of optoelectronic functionality into a new generation of all-fibre networks [1,2]. Although recent attentions have primarily focused on silicon as the material of choice for semiconductor photonics applications, germanium has some advantages over its counterpart. For example, it has higher nonlinearity, extended infrared transparency and has recently been demonstrated as a direct band gap laser medium [3]. Here we present the first optical characterisation of a germanium core optical fibre. The fibre was fabricated using a chemical micro fluidic deposition process [1] that uses GeH4 (germane) as a precursor to deposit amorphous germanium into the hole of a silica capillary. Figure 1 (a) shows an optical microscope image of the polished end face of a germanium fibre, with a 5.6 µm core diameter, which has been completely filled with the semiconductor material. Optical transmission measurements have been conducted over the wavelength range 2 µm to 11 µm, to confirm the broad mid-infrared operational window, and the guided output at 2.4 µm, imaged using a Spiricon Pyrocam III pyroelectric array camera, is shown in Figure 1 (b). At this wavelength the optical loss has been measured to be 20 dB/cm, which is comparable to losses measured for amorphous silicon fibres in the infrared. The potential for these germanium optical fibres to be used as optical modulators and infrared detectors will be discussed.
Mehta, P.
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Healy, N.
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Baril, N.F.
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Krishnamurthi, M.
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Sazio, P.J.A.
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Gopalan, V.
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Badding, J.V.
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Peacock, A.C.
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Mehta, P.
9cba5831-e3d5-4976-b246-98cf652f9665
Healy, N.
26eec85c-8d12-4f21-a67a-022f8dc2daab
Baril, N.F.
f5d317cc-48d8-4be0-8f08-5385e700f8bb
Krishnamurthi, M.
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Sazio, P.J.A.
0d6200b5-9947-469a-8e97-9147da8a7158
Gopalan, V.
7927bd73-45f5-4501-a160-d294652c3fe0
Badding, J.V.
940f7adb-73df-4f8a-9c46-e47f5425fef0
Peacock, A.C.
685d924c-ef6b-401b-a0bd-acf1f8e758fc

Mehta, P., Healy, N., Baril, N.F., Krishnamurthi, M., Sazio, P.J.A., Gopalan, V., Badding, J.V. and Peacock, A.C. (2010) Optical characterisation of germanium optical fibres At Photon 10 Optics and Photonics Conference, United Kingdom. 23 - 26 Aug 2010.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Semiconductor core optical fibres are currently generating great interest as they promise to be a platform for the seamless incorporation of optoelectronic functionality into a new generation of all-fibre networks [1,2]. Although recent attentions have primarily focused on silicon as the material of choice for semiconductor photonics applications, germanium has some advantages over its counterpart. For example, it has higher nonlinearity, extended infrared transparency and has recently been demonstrated as a direct band gap laser medium [3]. Here we present the first optical characterisation of a germanium core optical fibre. The fibre was fabricated using a chemical micro fluidic deposition process [1] that uses GeH4 (germane) as a precursor to deposit amorphous germanium into the hole of a silica capillary. Figure 1 (a) shows an optical microscope image of the polished end face of a germanium fibre, with a 5.6 µm core diameter, which has been completely filled with the semiconductor material. Optical transmission measurements have been conducted over the wavelength range 2 µm to 11 µm, to confirm the broad mid-infrared operational window, and the guided output at 2.4 µm, imaged using a Spiricon Pyrocam III pyroelectric array camera, is shown in Figure 1 (b). At this wavelength the optical loss has been measured to be 20 dB/cm, which is comparable to losses measured for amorphous silicon fibres in the infrared. The potential for these germanium optical fibres to be used as optical modulators and infrared detectors will be discussed.

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e-pub ahead of print date: August 2010
Venue - Dates: Photon 10 Optics and Photonics Conference, United Kingdom, 2010-08-23 - 2010-08-26
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

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Local EPrints ID: 340283
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/340283
PURE UUID: 7bd3d5bd-6cee-40c1-9e12-81be7a41d716
ORCID for P.J.A. Sazio: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6506-9266
ORCID for A.C. Peacock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1940-7172

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Date deposited: 18 Jun 2012 13:44
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:45

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Contributors

Author: P. Mehta
Author: N. Healy
Author: N.F. Baril
Author: M. Krishnamurthi
Author: P.J.A. Sazio ORCID iD
Author: V. Gopalan
Author: J.V. Badding
Author: A.C. Peacock ORCID iD

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