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Life course body mass index and risk of knee osteoarthritis at the age of 53 years: evidence from the 1946 British birth cohort study

Life course body mass index and risk of knee osteoarthritis at the age of 53 years: evidence from the 1946 British birth cohort study
Life course body mass index and risk of knee osteoarthritis at the age of 53 years: evidence from the 1946 British birth cohort study
Introduction: The authors examined how body mass index (BMI) across life is linked to the risk of midlife knee osteoarthritis (OA), testing whether prolonged exposure to high BMI or high BMI at a particular period has the greatest influence on the risk of knee OA.

Methods: A population-based British birth cohort of 3035 men and women underwent clinical examination for knee OA at age 53 years.Heights and weights were measured 10 times from 2 to 53 years. Analyses were stratified by gender and adjusted for occupation and activity levels.

Results: The prevalence of knee OA was higher in women than in men (12.9% (n=194) vs 7.4% (n=108)). In men, the association between BMI and later knee OA was evident at 20 years (p=0.038) and remained until 53 years (OR per z-score 1.38 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.71)). In women, there was evidence for an association at 15 years (p=0.003); at 53 years, the OR was 1.89 (95% CI 1.59 to 2.24) per z-score increase in BMI. Changes in BMI from childhood in women and from adolescence in men were also positively associated with knee OA. A structured modelling approach to disentange the way in which BMI is linked to knee OA suggested that prolonged exposure to high BMI throughout adulthood carried the highest risk and that there was no additional risk conferred from adolescence once adult BMI had been accounted for.

Conclusion: This study suggests that the risk of knee OA accumulates from exposure to a high BMI through adulthood.

0003-4967
655-660
Wills, A.K.
a49cf0bc-8fe1-4672-8ff2-da46760d2059
Black, S.
32bdd48e-0bcf-456a-8e1d-b5f2804a847e
Cooper, R.
6cd7b578-a1fa-4511-bc7d-9addc4baf372
Coppack, R.J.
77f08357-c1b4-45f5-a6f2-ed17cb48e320
Hardy, R.
b3f0f66e-4cda-4e9a-aca1-955f7ecdd132
Martin, K.R.
74045225-5efb-4d87-8eaa-a32fae665c02
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Kuh, D.
6c5d95a4-433d-4895-bd95-86a7d5fe76a5
Wills, A.K.
a49cf0bc-8fe1-4672-8ff2-da46760d2059
Black, S.
32bdd48e-0bcf-456a-8e1d-b5f2804a847e
Cooper, R.
6cd7b578-a1fa-4511-bc7d-9addc4baf372
Coppack, R.J.
77f08357-c1b4-45f5-a6f2-ed17cb48e320
Hardy, R.
b3f0f66e-4cda-4e9a-aca1-955f7ecdd132
Martin, K.R.
74045225-5efb-4d87-8eaa-a32fae665c02
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Kuh, D.
6c5d95a4-433d-4895-bd95-86a7d5fe76a5

Wills, A.K., Black, S., Cooper, R., Coppack, R.J., Hardy, R., Martin, K.R., Cooper, C. and Kuh, D. (2012) Life course body mass index and risk of knee osteoarthritis at the age of 53 years: evidence from the 1946 British birth cohort study. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 71 (5), 655-660. (doi:10.1136/ard.2011.154021). (PMID:21979003)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: The authors examined how body mass index (BMI) across life is linked to the risk of midlife knee osteoarthritis (OA), testing whether prolonged exposure to high BMI or high BMI at a particular period has the greatest influence on the risk of knee OA.

Methods: A population-based British birth cohort of 3035 men and women underwent clinical examination for knee OA at age 53 years.Heights and weights were measured 10 times from 2 to 53 years. Analyses were stratified by gender and adjusted for occupation and activity levels.

Results: The prevalence of knee OA was higher in women than in men (12.9% (n=194) vs 7.4% (n=108)). In men, the association between BMI and later knee OA was evident at 20 years (p=0.038) and remained until 53 years (OR per z-score 1.38 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.71)). In women, there was evidence for an association at 15 years (p=0.003); at 53 years, the OR was 1.89 (95% CI 1.59 to 2.24) per z-score increase in BMI. Changes in BMI from childhood in women and from adolescence in men were also positively associated with knee OA. A structured modelling approach to disentange the way in which BMI is linked to knee OA suggested that prolonged exposure to high BMI throughout adulthood carried the highest risk and that there was no additional risk conferred from adolescence once adult BMI had been accounted for.

Conclusion: This study suggests that the risk of knee OA accumulates from exposure to a high BMI through adulthood.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 October 2011
Published date: May 2012
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 340540
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/340540
ISSN: 0003-4967
PURE UUID: 642d3b3f-c458-4996-af7c-ac8c40dd1b73
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 25 Jun 2012 13:48
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 02:02

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Contributors

Author: A.K. Wills
Author: S. Black
Author: R. Cooper
Author: R.J. Coppack
Author: R. Hardy
Author: K.R. Martin
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: D. Kuh

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