The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Load distribution in bridge parapet supports in Southern England: re-evaluation, testing and analysis

Load distribution in bridge parapet supports in Southern England: re-evaluation, testing and analysis
Load distribution in bridge parapet supports in Southern England: re-evaluation, testing and analysis
This paper presents the background information, test results, analysis, and conclusions relating to the testing of two model bridge stringcourses subject to simulated parapet impact loading. Mott MacDonald Area 3 were appointed in 2002 by the Highways Agency to undertake the upgrade and replacement of all substandard BACO parapets fixed to existing structures. Area 3 in Southern England has a particularly large number of parapets that do not meet current design standards for normal containment. In many cases a combination of stringcourse geometry and a low assessment of in situ strength based upon a conservative model of load dispersal precluded the simple substitution and replacement of the parapet. Design of the test programme was based upon the composite characteristics of the five weakest bridge stringcourses identified in Area 3. The aim of the testing was fourfold. First, examine the load dispersal through the concrete and the reinforcement. Second, measure the ultimate failure load and calculate the structural reserve. Third, record the mode of failure. Fourth, ratify and produce a set of assessment recommendations. For all the criteria, a correlation
between theoretical prediction using current design standards and in situ performance was sought. The conclusions of this paper identify three important findings: (1) a localised horizontal slicing plane of shear failure across the plinth upstand is very unlikely, (2) only the shear links immediately surrounding the anchorage post are effective, (3) a simple load dispersal angle of 45? is too conservative and should be increased to 65? for assessment calculations. These recommendations have been applied to the current upgrade programme and have produced immediate cost savings for the Highways Agency of several million pounds. This paper highlights the benefits achievable when both client and consultant adopt a forward
thinking and progressive strategy to maximise both best value and structural safety.
1350-6307
588-605
Clubley, S.K.
d3217801-61eb-480d-a6a7-5873b5f6f0fd
Rothery, G.
828eedad-ec2c-4219-b94c-89d5b37d745a
Morey, M.
c5d5ccbc-71dd-40d3-874d-f56435e3b6b6
Turner, K.
4416a95c-8a0d-4051-88b9-61ce49ed44f6
Clubley, S.K.
d3217801-61eb-480d-a6a7-5873b5f6f0fd
Rothery, G.
828eedad-ec2c-4219-b94c-89d5b37d745a
Morey, M.
c5d5ccbc-71dd-40d3-874d-f56435e3b6b6
Turner, K.
4416a95c-8a0d-4051-88b9-61ce49ed44f6

Clubley, S.K., Rothery, G., Morey, M. and Turner, K. (2007) Load distribution in bridge parapet supports in Southern England: re-evaluation, testing and analysis. Engineering Failure Analysis, 14 (4), 588-605. (doi:10.1016/j.engfailanal.2006.03.009).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper presents the background information, test results, analysis, and conclusions relating to the testing of two model bridge stringcourses subject to simulated parapet impact loading. Mott MacDonald Area 3 were appointed in 2002 by the Highways Agency to undertake the upgrade and replacement of all substandard BACO parapets fixed to existing structures. Area 3 in Southern England has a particularly large number of parapets that do not meet current design standards for normal containment. In many cases a combination of stringcourse geometry and a low assessment of in situ strength based upon a conservative model of load dispersal precluded the simple substitution and replacement of the parapet. Design of the test programme was based upon the composite characteristics of the five weakest bridge stringcourses identified in Area 3. The aim of the testing was fourfold. First, examine the load dispersal through the concrete and the reinforcement. Second, measure the ultimate failure load and calculate the structural reserve. Third, record the mode of failure. Fourth, ratify and produce a set of assessment recommendations. For all the criteria, a correlation
between theoretical prediction using current design standards and in situ performance was sought. The conclusions of this paper identify three important findings: (1) a localised horizontal slicing plane of shear failure across the plinth upstand is very unlikely, (2) only the shear links immediately surrounding the anchorage post are effective, (3) a simple load dispersal angle of 45? is too conservative and should be increased to 65? for assessment calculations. These recommendations have been applied to the current upgrade programme and have produced immediate cost savings for the Highways Agency of several million pounds. This paper highlights the benefits achievable when both client and consultant adopt a forward
thinking and progressive strategy to maximise both best value and structural safety.

Text
Load_distribution_of_bridge_parapet_supports.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: June 2007
Organisations: Civil Maritime & Env. Eng & Sci Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 340769
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/340769
ISSN: 1350-6307
PURE UUID: d2073d98-8ec7-4037-b77a-788d8628c037
ORCID for S.K. Clubley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3779-242X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2012 09:13
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:43

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: S.K. Clubley ORCID iD
Author: G. Rothery
Author: M. Morey
Author: K. Turner

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×