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Factors associated with health-related quality of life after stroke: a 1-year prospective cohort study

Factors associated with health-related quality of life after stroke: a 1-year prospective cohort study
Factors associated with health-related quality of life after stroke: a 1-year prospective cohort study
Background. In line with patient-centered health care, it is necessary to understand patients’ perceptions of health. How stroke survivors perceive their health at different time points after stroke and which factors are associated with these feelings provide important information about relevant rehabilitation targets.

Objective. This study aimed to identify the independent factors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from a biopsychosocial perspective using the methods of multivariate regression at 3 different time points poststroke.

Methods. Included in the study were 99 patients from stroke units with diagnosed first-ever stroke. At admission and at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year poststroke, HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQoL-5D Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS). Consequences in Body Functions and Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors were documented using 155 categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for Stroke. Results. For a period of 1 year, problems with recreation and leisure, personality functions, energy and drive functions, and gait pattern functions were repeatedly associated with worse HRQoL. Whereas Body Functions and Activities and Participation explained more than three-fourths of the variances of HRQoL at 6 weeks and 3 months (R 2 = 0.80-0.93), the variation at 1 year was best explained by either Body Functions or Environmental Factors (R 2 = 0.51).

Conclusions. The results indicate the importance of Body Functions and Activities and Participation (mainly personality functions and recreation and leisure) on HRQoL within 3 months poststroke, but increased impact of Environmental Factors on HRQoL at 1 year.
health-related quality of life, stroke, functioning and disability, ICF
1545-9683
266-274
Algurén, Beatrix
0a879862-4660-4c72-bf91-97583b7bbdbc
Fridlund, Bengt
8c0bae59-602b-46eb-af70-b5c129cb3de4
Cieza, Alarcos
a0df25c5-ee2c-4580-82b3-d0a75591580e
Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant
e0166676-cec6-47d6-b647-42a391239b79
Christensson, Lennart
06bb0d45-a3f8-4da7-bbc8-775e909616fa
Algurén, Beatrix
0a879862-4660-4c72-bf91-97583b7bbdbc
Fridlund, Bengt
8c0bae59-602b-46eb-af70-b5c129cb3de4
Cieza, Alarcos
a0df25c5-ee2c-4580-82b3-d0a75591580e
Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant
e0166676-cec6-47d6-b647-42a391239b79
Christensson, Lennart
06bb0d45-a3f8-4da7-bbc8-775e909616fa

Algurén, Beatrix, Fridlund, Bengt, Cieza, Alarcos, Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant and Christensson, Lennart (2012) Factors associated with health-related quality of life after stroke: a 1-year prospective cohort study. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 26 (3), 266-274. (doi:10.1177/1545968311414204). (PMID:21825005)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background. In line with patient-centered health care, it is necessary to understand patients’ perceptions of health. How stroke survivors perceive their health at different time points after stroke and which factors are associated with these feelings provide important information about relevant rehabilitation targets.

Objective. This study aimed to identify the independent factors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from a biopsychosocial perspective using the methods of multivariate regression at 3 different time points poststroke.

Methods. Included in the study were 99 patients from stroke units with diagnosed first-ever stroke. At admission and at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year poststroke, HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQoL-5D Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS). Consequences in Body Functions and Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors were documented using 155 categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for Stroke. Results. For a period of 1 year, problems with recreation and leisure, personality functions, energy and drive functions, and gait pattern functions were repeatedly associated with worse HRQoL. Whereas Body Functions and Activities and Participation explained more than three-fourths of the variances of HRQoL at 6 weeks and 3 months (R 2 = 0.80-0.93), the variation at 1 year was best explained by either Body Functions or Environmental Factors (R 2 = 0.51).

Conclusions. The results indicate the importance of Body Functions and Activities and Participation (mainly personality functions and recreation and leisure) on HRQoL within 3 months poststroke, but increased impact of Environmental Factors on HRQoL at 1 year.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 8 August 2011
Published date: March 2012
Keywords: health-related quality of life, stroke, functioning and disability, ICF
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 340792
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/340792
ISSN: 1545-9683
PURE UUID: 322b52fd-777e-4191-9d9d-27c2a51563de

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Date deposited: 03 Jul 2012 09:06
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:41

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Contributors

Author: Beatrix Algurén
Author: Bengt Fridlund
Author: Alarcos Cieza
Author: Katharina Stibrant Sunnerhagen
Author: Lennart Christensson

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