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Rolling contact fatigue - review and case study

Rolling contact fatigue - review and case study
Rolling contact fatigue - review and case study
Wear, or more specifically Rolling Contact Wear (RCW), is the primary result of the damage accumulation process termed Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF). This paper aims to explain the often confusing terminology, along with the principles and mechanisms of RCF; which in turn will lead the reader to an understanding and recognition of the key visual features used by fault investigators to determine the cause of a RCF component failure. The work will be given a military aerospace context through a current case study: The combining transmission of a front line RAF Chinook aircraft was removed from service with suspected wear damage. The health of the transmission was maintained through a programme of servicing tasks that included vibration monitoring through Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS). An increasing vibration trend of a specific bearing prompted the removal of the transmission. Subsequent analysis presented here, revealed that the roller bearing displayed evidence of surface and subsurface origin macropitting. It was determined that if it had not been removed, the bearing could have led to catastrophic failure of the transmission and possibly the whole aircraft. This represents a significant step forward in the implementation of HUMS for UK military helicopters
Symonds, Nicola
cc8585b0-89f5-471c-84fd-969176516829
Symonds, Nicola
cc8585b0-89f5-471c-84fd-969176516829

Symonds, Nicola (2004) Rolling contact fatigue - review and case study. Control and Reduction of Wear in Military Platforms NATO AVT-109, Williamsburg, United States. 06 - 10 Jun 2004.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Wear, or more specifically Rolling Contact Wear (RCW), is the primary result of the damage accumulation process termed Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF). This paper aims to explain the often confusing terminology, along with the principles and mechanisms of RCF; which in turn will lead the reader to an understanding and recognition of the key visual features used by fault investigators to determine the cause of a RCF component failure. The work will be given a military aerospace context through a current case study: The combining transmission of a front line RAF Chinook aircraft was removed from service with suspected wear damage. The health of the transmission was maintained through a programme of servicing tasks that included vibration monitoring through Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS). An increasing vibration trend of a specific bearing prompted the removal of the transmission. Subsequent analysis presented here, revealed that the roller bearing displayed evidence of surface and subsurface origin macropitting. It was determined that if it had not been removed, the bearing could have led to catastrophic failure of the transmission and possibly the whole aircraft. This represents a significant step forward in the implementation of HUMS for UK military helicopters

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AVT109_presentation_2004.pdf - Other
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More information

Published date: June 2004
Additional Information: This work was completed while Dr Nicola Symonds was with the MoD, UK
Venue - Dates: Control and Reduction of Wear in Military Platforms NATO AVT-109, Williamsburg, United States, 2004-06-06 - 2004-06-10
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 341172
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/341172
PURE UUID: 70558310-bc36-46fd-b253-010f52b29e4d

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Date deposited: 17 Aug 2012 09:31
Last modified: 02 Oct 2020 16:35

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