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Aspects relevant for functioning in patients with ankylosing spondylitis according to the health professionals: a Delphi study with the ICF as reference

Aspects relevant for functioning in patients with ankylosing spondylitis according to the health professionals: a Delphi study with the ICF as reference
Aspects relevant for functioning in patients with ankylosing spondylitis according to the health professionals: a Delphi study with the ICF as reference
Objective. In AS there is no agreed definition of which aspects are important when describing functioning. This limits the possibility to classify, evaluate and investigate the consequences of the disease. This study aimed to achieve consensus among health professionals on which aspects of functioning are typical and relevant for AS patients using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as reference.

Methods. An international Delphi study through e-mail was performed among different health professions. Answers to open questions on areas relevant for functioning in the first round were linked to ICF categories and analysed in the two following two rounds for the degree of consensus.

Results. Of the 267 experts invited, 126 agreed to participate and 74 participated in all rounds; 28 were rheumatologists, 6 rheumatology nurses, 24 physiotherapists, 2 occupational therapists, 4 psychologists, 8 rehabilitation physicians and 2 social workers. More than 80% agreement was reached on 141 ICF categories, of which 30 (21%) were part of Body functions; 27 (19%) of Body structures; 56 (40%) of Activities and Participation; and 28 (20%) of Environmental factors. In addition, two Personal factors —illness knowledge and coping— were agreed upon.

Conclusion. 141 ICF categories and two personal factors represent the reference of functioning in AS from the perspective of health professional. The largest number of categories concerned restrictions in activities. Also, the impact of AS on participation in life situations and the role of environmental factors were underscored. This broadens the view on functioning in AS and has implications for future research into functioning.
ankylosing spondylitis, disability evaluation, quality of life, attitude of health professionals, outcome measures
1462-0324
997-1002
Boonen, Annelies
c32bd0a4-48b2-45f9-9ab3-5ff0074b7f32
van Berkel, Monique
7871c545-718f-46cf-bcfd-c11d815949b4
Kirchberger, Inge
910fb097-a8f1-472e-8863-421e458523e1
Cieza, Alarcos
a0df25c5-ee2c-4580-82b3-d0a75591580e
Stucki, Gerold
0534525c-103b-45be-b0a5-061d8867ef0d
van der Heijde, Désirée
25d8784d-95e8-4f03-a210-4719bf2a98ce
Boonen, Annelies
c32bd0a4-48b2-45f9-9ab3-5ff0074b7f32
van Berkel, Monique
7871c545-718f-46cf-bcfd-c11d815949b4
Kirchberger, Inge
910fb097-a8f1-472e-8863-421e458523e1
Cieza, Alarcos
a0df25c5-ee2c-4580-82b3-d0a75591580e
Stucki, Gerold
0534525c-103b-45be-b0a5-061d8867ef0d
van der Heijde, Désirée
25d8784d-95e8-4f03-a210-4719bf2a98ce

Boonen, Annelies, van Berkel, Monique, Kirchberger, Inge, Cieza, Alarcos, Stucki, Gerold and van der Heijde, Désirée (2009) Aspects relevant for functioning in patients with ankylosing spondylitis according to the health professionals: a Delphi study with the ICF as reference. Rheumatology, 48 (8), 997-1002. (doi:10.1093/rheumatology/kep150). (PMID:19542213)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective. In AS there is no agreed definition of which aspects are important when describing functioning. This limits the possibility to classify, evaluate and investigate the consequences of the disease. This study aimed to achieve consensus among health professionals on which aspects of functioning are typical and relevant for AS patients using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as reference.

Methods. An international Delphi study through e-mail was performed among different health professions. Answers to open questions on areas relevant for functioning in the first round were linked to ICF categories and analysed in the two following two rounds for the degree of consensus.

Results. Of the 267 experts invited, 126 agreed to participate and 74 participated in all rounds; 28 were rheumatologists, 6 rheumatology nurses, 24 physiotherapists, 2 occupational therapists, 4 psychologists, 8 rehabilitation physicians and 2 social workers. More than 80% agreement was reached on 141 ICF categories, of which 30 (21%) were part of Body functions; 27 (19%) of Body structures; 56 (40%) of Activities and Participation; and 28 (20%) of Environmental factors. In addition, two Personal factors —illness knowledge and coping— were agreed upon.

Conclusion. 141 ICF categories and two personal factors represent the reference of functioning in AS from the perspective of health professional. The largest number of categories concerned restrictions in activities. Also, the impact of AS on participation in life situations and the role of environmental factors were underscored. This broadens the view on functioning in AS and has implications for future research into functioning.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 19 June 2009
Published date: August 2009
Keywords: ankylosing spondylitis, disability evaluation, quality of life, attitude of health professionals, outcome measures
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 341343
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/341343
ISSN: 1462-0324
PURE UUID: c1d6b09a-8d7d-444c-b6f4-653c32b79461

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Date deposited: 20 Jul 2012 08:46
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:57

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