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Paper & power: modifying electrical insulation paper

Paper & power: modifying electrical insulation paper
Paper & power: modifying electrical insulation paper
Paper is employed in conjunction with oil in the electrical industry to insulate high voltage cables and transformers. This research examines changes in the electrical performance of insulation paper as a result of changes to its structure and surface properties. In addition to the electrical properties of the base paper, the effects of fibre type, fillers and the role of paper additives were investigated. Variations in filler content, density, thickness, smoothness and porosity were also considered for their impact on the dielectric breakdown strength of oil-paper insulation.

Of the three fibre types that were tested, the industry standard unbleached kraft pulp performed best electrically. Of the two fillers that were tried, the hydrophobic talcum filler clearly outperformed the hydrophilic bentonite filler. In comparison to the unfilled samples, the latter severely degraded the electrical breakdown strength of the paper, whereas the talcum filled samples displayed improved electrical performance. The high amount of filler employed in the trials reduced the mechanical strength of the papers and lead to the trial of additives to address this effect. The addition of both cationic starch and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) increased the mechanical strength of the paper and showed positive results in the electrical breakdown tests. The dielectric spectroscopy measurements, however, revealed a marked increase in permittivity and dielectric loss for the samples containing the cationic starch. The use of PVA appeared to alleviate this effect. In a similar vein, calendering as a surface treatment showed positive results for the electrical breakdown strength, but a negative influence on the dielectric performance.
1612-0485
21-24
Kleemann, T.A.
3acbd1d4-e8f4-41ac-bff4-2307d0f3504f
Lewin, P.L.
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Badakh, S.J.
a8991928-ca5e-4bf5-9281-fb56e478e374
Kleemann, S.G.
cd7b87a2-d5ed-4130-9bde-a90bbde01fc1
Kleemann, T.A.
3acbd1d4-e8f4-41ac-bff4-2307d0f3504f
Lewin, P.L.
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Badakh, S.J.
a8991928-ca5e-4bf5-9281-fb56e478e374
Kleemann, S.G.
cd7b87a2-d5ed-4130-9bde-a90bbde01fc1

Kleemann, T.A., Lewin, P.L., Badakh, S.J. and Kleemann, S.G. (2012) Paper & power: modifying electrical insulation paper. Professional Papermaking, 2012 (1), 21-24.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Paper is employed in conjunction with oil in the electrical industry to insulate high voltage cables and transformers. This research examines changes in the electrical performance of insulation paper as a result of changes to its structure and surface properties. In addition to the electrical properties of the base paper, the effects of fibre type, fillers and the role of paper additives were investigated. Variations in filler content, density, thickness, smoothness and porosity were also considered for their impact on the dielectric breakdown strength of oil-paper insulation.

Of the three fibre types that were tested, the industry standard unbleached kraft pulp performed best electrically. Of the two fillers that were tried, the hydrophobic talcum filler clearly outperformed the hydrophilic bentonite filler. In comparison to the unfilled samples, the latter severely degraded the electrical breakdown strength of the paper, whereas the talcum filled samples displayed improved electrical performance. The high amount of filler employed in the trials reduced the mechanical strength of the papers and lead to the trial of additives to address this effect. The addition of both cationic starch and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) increased the mechanical strength of the paper and showed positive results in the electrical breakdown tests. The dielectric spectroscopy measurements, however, revealed a marked increase in permittivity and dielectric loss for the samples containing the cationic starch. The use of PVA appeared to alleviate this effect. In a similar vein, calendering as a surface treatment showed positive results for the electrical breakdown strength, but a negative influence on the dielectric performance.

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More information

Published date: 31 May 2012
Additional Information: Special paper
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 341420
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/341420
ISSN: 1612-0485
PURE UUID: 9152bdd6-58a7-4a7d-b3f5-73c6d56d2706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jul 2012 13:19
Last modified: 20 Nov 2021 12:33

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Contributors

Author: T.A. Kleemann
Author: P.L. Lewin
Author: S.J. Badakh
Author: S.G. Kleemann

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