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An unusual hermaphrodite reproductive trait in the Antarctic brooding bivalve Lissarca miliaris (Philobryidae) from the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean

An unusual hermaphrodite reproductive trait in the Antarctic brooding bivalve Lissarca miliaris (Philobryidae) from the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean
An unusual hermaphrodite reproductive trait in the Antarctic brooding bivalve Lissarca miliaris (Philobryidae) from the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean
The Antarctic marine environment is extreme in its low temperatures and short periods of primary productivity. Invertebrates must therefore adapt to maximise reproductive output where low temperature and limited food slows larval development. Brooding is a common reproductive trait in Antarctic marine bivalves; larval development occurs within the mantle cavity, and larvae are released as fully developed young. Lissarca miliaris is a small, short lived, shallow-water brooding bivalve of circum-Antarctic distribution and found most abundant in the sub-Antarctic Magellan Region and islands of the Scotia Arc. Here, an unusual hermaphrodite reproductive trait is described for L. miliaris from King George Island (62?14’S, 58?38’W) and Signy Island (60?42’S, 45?36’W), Antarctica, using histological and dissection techniques. Specimens demonstrate simultaneous and sequential hermaphrodite traits; male and female gonads develop simultaneously but the production of oocytes is reduced while testes are ripe. Functional females are more abundant in specimens above 3mm shell length, although male reproductive tissue persists and functional males are found in all size classes. The number of previtellogenic oocytes produced by far exceeds the number of oocytes extruded and brooded, which may indicate an ancestral link to a planktotrophic past. Hermaphroditism in L. miliaris maximises reproductive efficiency in a short-lived species in which the female’s capacity to brood its young is limited, and demonstrates a specialised adaptation to a cold stenothermal and food limited environment prevailing in the Southern Ocean.
0722-4060
1-11
Reed, Adam
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Linse, Katrin
74d7ddc0-74a1-4777-ac1d-3f39ae1935ad
Reed, Adam
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Linse, Katrin
74d7ddc0-74a1-4777-ac1d-3f39ae1935ad

Reed, Adam, Thatje, Sven and Linse, Katrin (2013) An unusual hermaphrodite reproductive trait in the Antarctic brooding bivalve Lissarca miliaris (Philobryidae) from the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean. Polar Biology, 36, 1-11. (doi:10.1007/s00300-012-1233-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Antarctic marine environment is extreme in its low temperatures and short periods of primary productivity. Invertebrates must therefore adapt to maximise reproductive output where low temperature and limited food slows larval development. Brooding is a common reproductive trait in Antarctic marine bivalves; larval development occurs within the mantle cavity, and larvae are released as fully developed young. Lissarca miliaris is a small, short lived, shallow-water brooding bivalve of circum-Antarctic distribution and found most abundant in the sub-Antarctic Magellan Region and islands of the Scotia Arc. Here, an unusual hermaphrodite reproductive trait is described for L. miliaris from King George Island (62?14’S, 58?38’W) and Signy Island (60?42’S, 45?36’W), Antarctica, using histological and dissection techniques. Specimens demonstrate simultaneous and sequential hermaphrodite traits; male and female gonads develop simultaneously but the production of oocytes is reduced while testes are ripe. Functional females are more abundant in specimens above 3mm shell length, although male reproductive tissue persists and functional males are found in all size classes. The number of previtellogenic oocytes produced by far exceeds the number of oocytes extruded and brooded, which may indicate an ancestral link to a planktotrophic past. Hermaphroditism in L. miliaris maximises reproductive efficiency in a short-lived species in which the female’s capacity to brood its young is limited, and demonstrates a specialised adaptation to a cold stenothermal and food limited environment prevailing in the Southern Ocean.

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Published date: January 2013
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Ocean Biochemistry & Ecosystems

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Local EPrints ID: 342019
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342019
ISSN: 0722-4060
PURE UUID: e632cf67-48eb-4a1c-a35d-4f09f45bbc63

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Date deposited: 09 Aug 2012 10:38
Last modified: 06 Aug 2019 18:54

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