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Fan broadband noise shielding for over-wing engines

Fan broadband noise shielding for over-wing engines
Fan broadband noise shielding for over-wing engines
Increasingly demanding community noise targets are promoting noise performance ever higher on the list of airliner design drivers. In response, significant noise reductions are being made, though at a declining rate—it appears that a whole airframe approach is now needed to achieve significant further gains. As a possible step in this direction, over-wing engine installations are considered here, which use the airframe itself as a noise shield. The paper is the account of an experimental investigation of the comparative shielding performances of a range of relative engine positions on such a layout. Using the statistical modelling technique Kriging, we build an approximation of the noise shielding metric as a function of the position of the engines above the wing—this can serve as the input to multi-disciplinary design trade-off studies. We then compare the results found with the results of applying simple half-barrier diffraction theory to the same problem. We conclude that the latter could be considered as a first order, conceptual design tool, though it misses certain features of the design merit landscape identified by the experiment presented here.
0022-460X
5054-5068
Powell, Stephen
17ca31b3-10bf-4054-b6f2-bc746ccd75cc
Sobester, Andras
096857b0-cad6-45ae-9ae6-e66b8cc5d81b
Joseph, Phillip F.
9c30491e-8464-4c9a-8723-2abc62bdf75d
Powell, Stephen
17ca31b3-10bf-4054-b6f2-bc746ccd75cc
Sobester, Andras
096857b0-cad6-45ae-9ae6-e66b8cc5d81b
Joseph, Phillip F.
9c30491e-8464-4c9a-8723-2abc62bdf75d

Powell, Stephen, Sobester, Andras and Joseph, Phillip F. (2012) Fan broadband noise shielding for over-wing engines. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331 (23), 5054-5068. (doi:10.1016/j.jsv.2012.06.012).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Increasingly demanding community noise targets are promoting noise performance ever higher on the list of airliner design drivers. In response, significant noise reductions are being made, though at a declining rate—it appears that a whole airframe approach is now needed to achieve significant further gains. As a possible step in this direction, over-wing engine installations are considered here, which use the airframe itself as a noise shield. The paper is the account of an experimental investigation of the comparative shielding performances of a range of relative engine positions on such a layout. Using the statistical modelling technique Kriging, we build an approximation of the noise shielding metric as a function of the position of the engines above the wing—this can serve as the input to multi-disciplinary design trade-off studies. We then compare the results found with the results of applying simple half-barrier diffraction theory to the same problem. We conclude that the latter could be considered as a first order, conceptual design tool, though it misses certain features of the design merit landscape identified by the experiment presented here.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Submitted date: 19 September 2011
Accepted/In Press date: 12 July 2012
Published date: November 2012
Organisations: Aeronautics, Astronautics & Comp. Eng

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 342179
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342179
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: 5d60467e-e50c-4241-b573-64d7852d2209
ORCID for Andras Sobester: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8997-4375

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Aug 2012 14:08
Last modified: 07 Aug 2019 00:44

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