The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Sequence and genome organization of a human small round-structured (Norwalk-like) virus

Lambden, P.R., Caul, E.O., Ashley, C.R. and Clarke, I.N. (1993) Sequence and genome organization of a human small round-structured (Norwalk-like) virus Science, 259, (5094), pp. 516-519. (doi:10.1126/science.8380940). (PMID:8380940).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Small round-structured viruses (SRSVs), also known as Norwalk or Norwalk-like viruses, are the major worldwide cause of acute, epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis in humans. These viruses, which contain a single-stranded RNA genome, have remained refractory to molecular characterization because of the small amounts of virus in clinical samples and the absence of an animal model and an in vitro culture system. The complete genomic nucleotide sequence of an SRSV, Southampton virus, was determined. The 7696-nucleotide RNA genome encodes three open reading frames whose sequences and organization strongly support proposals that SRVSs are members of the Caliciviridae.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 22 January 1993
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 342333
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342333
ISSN: 0036-8075
PURE UUID: 31673681-5309-4829-af86-9375a159c76d
ORCID for I.N. Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4938-1620

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Aug 2012 10:40
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:29

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: P.R. Lambden
Author: E.O. Caul
Author: C.R. Ashley
Author: I.N. Clarke ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×