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Working together: neighbourhood watch, reassurance policing and the potential of partnerships

Working together: neighbourhood watch, reassurance policing and the potential of partnerships
Working together: neighbourhood watch, reassurance policing and the potential of partnerships
Neighborhood watch (NW) began as a response to shifting attitudes about the role of police in the community, and as a movement to have more community involvement in crime prevention. These schemes are an attempt by the police and community to reduce crime, and through them police have encouraged communities to take responsibility for crime prevention and controlling social or physical disorder in their neighborhoods. However, with all the widespread enthusiasm and support for NW in Australia, there is research evidence to suggest that NW is ineffective in preventing crime. This paper suggests that a better way to assess the effectiveness of NW is to view it as a vehicle to enhance partnerships between police, other agencies, and the community which, in turn can effectively improve police/community relations, improve perceptions of safety and security, and enhance community involvement. This requires a change in focus in viewing NW. The paper suggests that NW schemes should be assessed on the capacity to enhance the relationship between police and community, the ability to improve feelings of safety and security, and the ability to expand community involvement in initiatives of safety and prevention. This venture is a move away from traditional NW imperatives but research suggests that significant progress can be made in reducing crime while reassuring the public, building community capacity, improving the quantity and quality of police citizen contact, and enhancing police legitimacy.
9780642538871
303
Australian Institute of Criminology
Fleming, Jenny
61449384-ccab-40b3-b494-0852c956ca19
Fleming, Jenny
61449384-ccab-40b3-b494-0852c956ca19

Fleming, Jenny (2005) Working together: neighbourhood watch, reassurance policing and the potential of partnerships (Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, 303), Canberra, AU. Australian Institute of Criminology

Record type: Book

Abstract

Neighborhood watch (NW) began as a response to shifting attitudes about the role of police in the community, and as a movement to have more community involvement in crime prevention. These schemes are an attempt by the police and community to reduce crime, and through them police have encouraged communities to take responsibility for crime prevention and controlling social or physical disorder in their neighborhoods. However, with all the widespread enthusiasm and support for NW in Australia, there is research evidence to suggest that NW is ineffective in preventing crime. This paper suggests that a better way to assess the effectiveness of NW is to view it as a vehicle to enhance partnerships between police, other agencies, and the community which, in turn can effectively improve police/community relations, improve perceptions of safety and security, and enhance community involvement. This requires a change in focus in viewing NW. The paper suggests that NW schemes should be assessed on the capacity to enhance the relationship between police and community, the ability to improve feelings of safety and security, and the ability to expand community involvement in initiatives of safety and prevention. This venture is a move away from traditional NW imperatives but research suggests that significant progress can be made in reducing crime while reassuring the public, building community capacity, improving the quantity and quality of police citizen contact, and enhancing police legitimacy.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 342340
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342340
ISBN: 9780642538871
PURE UUID: fb786c0d-10b8-491f-99ae-3773cd57e053
ORCID for Jenny Fleming: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7913-3345

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Aug 2012 13:53
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 03:25

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