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The use of blowing flow control to reduce bluff body interaction noise

The use of blowing flow control to reduce bluff body interaction noise
The use of blowing flow control to reduce bluff body interaction noise
When an unsteady wake from an upstream body impinges on a downstream body, the resultant interaction noise can be significant. The use of distributed blowing through the surface of a cylinder to reduce this source of noise was investigated experimentally. Two configurations were tested, one with a cylinder upstream of an H-beam (denoted the OH configuration) and the other with an H-beam upstream of the cylinder (denoted the HO configuration). The mean velocities and velocity fluctuations were determined in the flowfield using particle image velocimetry. The application of blowing to theOHconfiguration reduced the streamwise Reynolds stress (u0u0). This resulted in a noise reduction of 9.2 dB at a Strouhal number (St) of 0.2. There was a broadband noise reduction of 3 dB averaged over a Strouhal number range 0:05 < St < 5. The effect of blowing on the HO configuration was to inhibit the strong crossflow Reynolds stress (w0w0) between the H-beam and the cylinder. This resulted in a noise reduction of 15 dB at a Strouhal number of 0.8. There was a broadband noise reduction of 4.6 dB averaged over the frequency range 0:05 < St < 6:3. The effect of blowing produced additional high-frequency noise. This additional noise was minimized with blowing applied through a sintered plate with a very small pore diameter.
0001-1452
1670-1684
Angland, D.
b86880c6-31fa-452b-ada8-4bbd83cda47f
Zhang, X.
3056a795-80f7-4bbd-9c75-ecbc93085421
Goodyer, M
47649dee-f017-4744-b293-78eef1be34a8
Angland, D.
b86880c6-31fa-452b-ada8-4bbd83cda47f
Zhang, X.
3056a795-80f7-4bbd-9c75-ecbc93085421
Goodyer, M
47649dee-f017-4744-b293-78eef1be34a8

Angland, D., Zhang, X. and Goodyer, M (2012) The use of blowing flow control to reduce bluff body interaction noise. AIAA Journal, 50 (8), 1670-1684. (doi:10.2514/1.J051074).

Record type: Article

Abstract

When an unsteady wake from an upstream body impinges on a downstream body, the resultant interaction noise can be significant. The use of distributed blowing through the surface of a cylinder to reduce this source of noise was investigated experimentally. Two configurations were tested, one with a cylinder upstream of an H-beam (denoted the OH configuration) and the other with an H-beam upstream of the cylinder (denoted the HO configuration). The mean velocities and velocity fluctuations were determined in the flowfield using particle image velocimetry. The application of blowing to theOHconfiguration reduced the streamwise Reynolds stress (u0u0). This resulted in a noise reduction of 9.2 dB at a Strouhal number (St) of 0.2. There was a broadband noise reduction of 3 dB averaged over a Strouhal number range 0:05 < St < 5. The effect of blowing on the HO configuration was to inhibit the strong crossflow Reynolds stress (w0w0) between the H-beam and the cylinder. This resulted in a noise reduction of 15 dB at a Strouhal number of 0.8. There was a broadband noise reduction of 4.6 dB averaged over the frequency range 0:05 < St < 6:3. The effect of blowing produced additional high-frequency noise. This additional noise was minimized with blowing applied through a sintered plate with a very small pore diameter.

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03 - AIAA 2010-3786_authors
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Published date: August 2012
Organisations: Aerodynamics & Flight Mechanics Group

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Local EPrints ID: 342436
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342436
ISSN: 0001-1452
PURE UUID: 37f69d36-621c-4149-ae53-3f0acc824539

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Date deposited: 30 Aug 2012 08:06
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 21:54

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