The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The legacy of sperm banking: how fertility monitoring and disposal of sperm are linked with views of cancer treatment

The legacy of sperm banking: how fertility monitoring and disposal of sperm are linked with views of cancer treatment
The legacy of sperm banking: how fertility monitoring and disposal of sperm are linked with views of cancer treatment
Background: sperm banking is recommended for all men before cancer treatment, which carries a risk of long-term gonadal damage. However, relatively few men take up the offer. Among them, few attend for fertility monitoring or agree to sperm disposal where fertility recovers. Sperm banks are therefore burdened by long-term storage of samples that may not be needed for conception, with implications for healthcare resources. The aims here were to determine the views of men regarding personal benefits of sperm banking, and the advantages and disadvantages of fertility monitoring and disposal in the longer term.

Methods: semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 men who were diagnosed with cancer and had banked sperm at least 5 years previously. Men were asked to recall their experiences from diagnosis to the present time, focusing on the consequences for their fertility. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Results: results are discussed in relation to decisions surrounding banking sperm, fertility monitoring and attitudes to disposal of banked sperm. Complex attitudes were identified, with men's views reflecting their understanding of their current and future fertility and the possible trajectory of cancer itself. Men are overwhelmed by information on diagnosis and fail to understand the implications of cancer treatment for their future fertility.

Conclusions: in diagnosis, men are given large amounts of information about cancer and treatment but fail to understand the longer-term implications of sperm banking. These implications need to be specifically addressed at subsequent appointments in order to optimize fertility monitoring and timely disposal of sperm samples
2791-2798
Eiser, C.
f8aa455e-934b-486d-a06b-64fada121261
Arden-Close, E.
c1a6ff3d-6c3e-4355-b392-1963aed075d5
Morris, K.
4df92a43-2e62-4371-a857-cd99f7eeec83
Pacey, A.A.
c5f14ead-b2ba-4b42-878b-a2ba0993b8eb
Eiser, C.
f8aa455e-934b-486d-a06b-64fada121261
Arden-Close, E.
c1a6ff3d-6c3e-4355-b392-1963aed075d5
Morris, K.
4df92a43-2e62-4371-a857-cd99f7eeec83
Pacey, A.A.
c5f14ead-b2ba-4b42-878b-a2ba0993b8eb

Eiser, C., Arden-Close, E., Morris, K. and Pacey, A.A. (2011) The legacy of sperm banking: how fertility monitoring and disposal of sperm are linked with views of cancer treatment. Human Reproduction, 26 (10), 2791-2798. (doi:10.1093/humrep/der243).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: sperm banking is recommended for all men before cancer treatment, which carries a risk of long-term gonadal damage. However, relatively few men take up the offer. Among them, few attend for fertility monitoring or agree to sperm disposal where fertility recovers. Sperm banks are therefore burdened by long-term storage of samples that may not be needed for conception, with implications for healthcare resources. The aims here were to determine the views of men regarding personal benefits of sperm banking, and the advantages and disadvantages of fertility monitoring and disposal in the longer term.

Methods: semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 men who were diagnosed with cancer and had banked sperm at least 5 years previously. Men were asked to recall their experiences from diagnosis to the present time, focusing on the consequences for their fertility. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Results: results are discussed in relation to decisions surrounding banking sperm, fertility monitoring and attitudes to disposal of banked sperm. Complex attitudes were identified, with men's views reflecting their understanding of their current and future fertility and the possible trajectory of cancer itself. Men are overwhelmed by information on diagnosis and fail to understand the implications of cancer treatment for their future fertility.

Conclusions: in diagnosis, men are given large amounts of information about cancer and treatment but fail to understand the longer-term implications of sperm banking. These implications need to be specifically addressed at subsequent appointments in order to optimize fertility monitoring and timely disposal of sperm samples

PDF
DER243.pdf - Author's Original
Restricted to Repository staff only

More information

Published date: 2011
Additional Information: Contact: e.j.arden-close@soton.ac.uk
Organisations: Human Wellbeing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 342468
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342468
PURE UUID: 7f74b9e6-7bd7-423d-b6f2-526297534e3c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Aug 2012 13:12
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:28

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×