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Getting ready for REDD+ in Tanzania: a case study of progress and challenges

Getting ready for REDD+ in Tanzania: a case study of progress and challenges
Getting ready for REDD+ in Tanzania: a case study of progress and challenges
The proposed mechanism for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) offers significant potential for conserving forests to reduce negative impacts of climate change. Tanzania is one of nine pilot countries for the United Nations REDD Programme, receives significant funding from the Norwegian, Finnish and German governments and is a participant in the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility. In combination, these interventions aim to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, provide an income to rural communities and conserve biodiversity. The establishment of the UN-REDD Programme in Tanzania illustrates real-world challenges in a developing country. These include currently inadequate baseline forestry data sets (needed to calculate reference emission levels), inadequate government capacity and insufficient experience of implementing REDD+-type measures at operational levels. Additionally, for REDD+ to succeed, current users of forest resources must adopt new practices, including the equitable sharing of benefits that accrue from REDD+ implementation. These challenges are being addressed by combined donor support to implement a national forest inventory, remote sensing of forest cover, enhanced capacity for measuring, reporting and verification, and pilot projects to test REDD+ implementation linked to the existing Participatory Forest Management Programme. Our conclusion is that even in a country with considerable donor support, progressive forest policies, laws and regulations, an extensive network of managed forests and increasingly developed locally-based forest management approaches, implementing REDD+ presents many challenges. These are being met by coordinated, genuine partnerships between government, non-government and community-based agencies
0030-6053
339-351
Burgess, Neil D.
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Bahane, Bruno
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Clairs, Tim
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Danielsen, Finn
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Dalsgaard, Søren
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Funder, Mikkel
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Hagelberg, Niklas
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Harrison, Paul
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Haule, Christognus
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Kabalimu, Kekilia
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Kilahama, Felician
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Kilawe, Edward
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Lewis, Simon L.
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Lovett, Jon C.
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Lyatuu, Gertrude
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Marshall, Andrew R.
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Meshack, Charles
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Miles, Lera
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Milledge, Simon A.H.
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Munishi, Pantaleo K.T.
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Nashanda, Evarist
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Shirima, Deo
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Swetnam, Ruth D.
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Willcock, Simon
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Williams, Andrew
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Zahabu, Eliakim
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Burgess, Neil D.
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Bahane, Bruno
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Clairs, Tim
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Danielsen, Finn
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Dalsgaard, Søren
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Funder, Mikkel
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Hagelberg, Niklas
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Harrison, Paul
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Haule, Christognus
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Kabalimu, Kekilia
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Kilahama, Felician
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Kilawe, Edward
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Lewis, Simon L.
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Lovett, Jon C.
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Lyatuu, Gertrude
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Marshall, Andrew R.
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Meshack, Charles
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Miles, Lera
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Milledge, Simon A.H.
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Munishi, Pantaleo K.T.
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Nashanda, Evarist
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Shirima, Deo
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Swetnam, Ruth D.
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Willcock, Simon
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Williams, Andrew
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Zahabu, Eliakim
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Burgess, Neil D., Bahane, Bruno, Clairs, Tim, Danielsen, Finn, Dalsgaard, Søren, Funder, Mikkel, Hagelberg, Niklas, Harrison, Paul, Haule, Christognus, Kabalimu, Kekilia, Kilahama, Felician, Kilawe, Edward, Lewis, Simon L., Lovett, Jon C., Lyatuu, Gertrude, Marshall, Andrew R., Meshack, Charles, Miles, Lera, Milledge, Simon A.H., Munishi, Pantaleo K.T., Nashanda, Evarist, Shirima, Deo, Swetnam, Ruth D., Willcock, Simon, Williams, Andrew and Zahabu, Eliakim (2010) Getting ready for REDD+ in Tanzania: a case study of progress and challenges. Oryx, 44 (3), 339-351. (doi:10.1017/S0030605310000554).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The proposed mechanism for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) offers significant potential for conserving forests to reduce negative impacts of climate change. Tanzania is one of nine pilot countries for the United Nations REDD Programme, receives significant funding from the Norwegian, Finnish and German governments and is a participant in the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility. In combination, these interventions aim to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, provide an income to rural communities and conserve biodiversity. The establishment of the UN-REDD Programme in Tanzania illustrates real-world challenges in a developing country. These include currently inadequate baseline forestry data sets (needed to calculate reference emission levels), inadequate government capacity and insufficient experience of implementing REDD+-type measures at operational levels. Additionally, for REDD+ to succeed, current users of forest resources must adopt new practices, including the equitable sharing of benefits that accrue from REDD+ implementation. These challenges are being addressed by combined donor support to implement a national forest inventory, remote sensing of forest cover, enhanced capacity for measuring, reporting and verification, and pilot projects to test REDD+ implementation linked to the existing Participatory Forest Management Programme. Our conclusion is that even in a country with considerable donor support, progressive forest policies, laws and regulations, an extensive network of managed forests and increasingly developed locally-based forest management approaches, implementing REDD+ presents many challenges. These are being met by coordinated, genuine partnerships between government, non-government and community-based agencies

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Published date: July 2010
Organisations: Environmental

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 342528
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342528
ISSN: 0030-6053
PURE UUID: 7a93ef55-5f8d-47ce-87cd-94caec2737c3

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Date deposited: 05 Sep 2012 11:12
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:55

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Contributors

Author: Neil D. Burgess
Author: Bruno Bahane
Author: Tim Clairs
Author: Finn Danielsen
Author: Søren Dalsgaard
Author: Mikkel Funder
Author: Niklas Hagelberg
Author: Paul Harrison
Author: Christognus Haule
Author: Kekilia Kabalimu
Author: Felician Kilahama
Author: Edward Kilawe
Author: Simon L. Lewis
Author: Jon C. Lovett
Author: Gertrude Lyatuu
Author: Andrew R. Marshall
Author: Charles Meshack
Author: Lera Miles
Author: Simon A.H. Milledge
Author: Pantaleo K.T. Munishi
Author: Evarist Nashanda
Author: Deo Shirima
Author: Ruth D. Swetnam
Author: Simon Willcock
Author: Andrew Williams
Author: Eliakim Zahabu

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