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Design and development of a pole climbing surveillance robot

Design and development of a pole climbing surveillance robot
Design and development of a pole climbing surveillance robot
The cost of installing, monitoring and servicing a fixed camera system can be high and not all areas are in need of constant surveying. The increase in crime in urban areas emphasizes the need for a more effective and efficient surveillance system, as a result could lead to fewer crimes. A temporary surveillance unit which is able to climb to gain an elevated view has great potential for both military and civilian application. This paper highlights how the patent pending climbing robotic system (PC-101) was developed to be used by London’s Metropolitan Police Forensic Department for analysing outdoor crime scenes especially that related to car accidents. When cars are involved in accidents in the Metropolitan area, depending on the scale of the incident, the road generally has to be shut off to traffic if there are serious casualties. Elevated images are required for cases which may be taken to court, which then the images are then used as evidence, therefore regulations on the quality and perspectives of the image have to be met. By climbing a range of existing street furniture such as street lamp post, a temporary platform eliminates the use of larger special vehicle which struggles to get to the crime scene as well as cuts down the duration of the road closure. 98% of London street lamps in the Metropolitan area are constructed out of steel structures which make the use of magnetic wheels for locomotion an ideal solution to the climbing problem. Once remote controlled to the top of the lamp post, the PC-101 makes use of its actuated camera arm/gimbal to take the required shot, which can be seen on the ground control unit. A surveillance tool of this sort can be used for many applications which include crowd/riot control, crime scene investigations, monitoring hostile environments and even the monitoring of nature within urban environments
Erbil, Mehmet Ali
07c050c5-b5fa-4cda-951d-ea123f6402b9
Prior, Stephen D.
9c753e49-092a-4dc5-b4cd-6d5ff77e9ced
Karamanoglu, Mehmet
635b350e-7c35-468b-b990-ef59089a1382
Odedra, Sid
52c8e986-73a5-412a-9f5d-987d13856077
Barlow, Chris
b05c692c-ba1c-4b9e-a9b1-e7dff049e0ef
Bell, Jonathon
42f79ea2-baba-4263-96a7-7b1acdb79162
Erbil, Mehmet Ali
07c050c5-b5fa-4cda-951d-ea123f6402b9
Prior, Stephen D.
9c753e49-092a-4dc5-b4cd-6d5ff77e9ced
Karamanoglu, Mehmet
635b350e-7c35-468b-b990-ef59089a1382
Odedra, Sid
52c8e986-73a5-412a-9f5d-987d13856077
Barlow, Chris
b05c692c-ba1c-4b9e-a9b1-e7dff049e0ef
Bell, Jonathon
42f79ea2-baba-4263-96a7-7b1acdb79162

Erbil, Mehmet Ali, Prior, Stephen D., Karamanoglu, Mehmet, Odedra, Sid, Barlow, Chris and Bell, Jonathon (2011) Design and development of a pole climbing surveillance robot. 2011 New Zealand Rapid Product Development Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. 07 - 08 Feb 2011.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The cost of installing, monitoring and servicing a fixed camera system can be high and not all areas are in need of constant surveying. The increase in crime in urban areas emphasizes the need for a more effective and efficient surveillance system, as a result could lead to fewer crimes. A temporary surveillance unit which is able to climb to gain an elevated view has great potential for both military and civilian application. This paper highlights how the patent pending climbing robotic system (PC-101) was developed to be used by London’s Metropolitan Police Forensic Department for analysing outdoor crime scenes especially that related to car accidents. When cars are involved in accidents in the Metropolitan area, depending on the scale of the incident, the road generally has to be shut off to traffic if there are serious casualties. Elevated images are required for cases which may be taken to court, which then the images are then used as evidence, therefore regulations on the quality and perspectives of the image have to be met. By climbing a range of existing street furniture such as street lamp post, a temporary platform eliminates the use of larger special vehicle which struggles to get to the crime scene as well as cuts down the duration of the road closure. 98% of London street lamps in the Metropolitan area are constructed out of steel structures which make the use of magnetic wheels for locomotion an ideal solution to the climbing problem. Once remote controlled to the top of the lamp post, the PC-101 makes use of its actuated camera arm/gimbal to take the required shot, which can be seen on the ground control unit. A surveillance tool of this sort can be used for many applications which include crowd/riot control, crime scene investigations, monitoring hostile environments and even the monitoring of nature within urban environments

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More information

Published date: 2011
Venue - Dates: 2011 New Zealand Rapid Product Development Conference, Auckland, New Zealand, 2011-02-07 - 2011-02-08
Organisations: Aeronautics, Astronautics & Comp. Eng

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 342837
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342837
PURE UUID: 2a951219-fe30-4725-98dd-f5a61158106d
ORCID for Stephen D. Prior: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4993-4942

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Sep 2012 13:27
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:20

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