The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Developing a low-cost beer dispensing robotic system for the service industry

Developing a low-cost beer dispensing robotic system for the service industry
Developing a low-cost beer dispensing robotic system for the service industry
As the prices of commercially available electronic and mechanical components decrease, manufacturers such as Devantech and Revolution Education have made encoded motor controller systems and microcontrollers very accessible to engineers and designers. This has made it possible to design sophisticated robotic and mechatronic systems very rapidly and at relatively low cost. A recent project in the Autonomous Systems Lab at Middlesex University, UK was to design and build a small, automated, robotic bartender based around the 5 litre Heineken 'Draughtkeg' system, which is capable of patrolling a bar and dispensing beer when signalled to by a customer. Because the system was designed as a commercial product, design constraints focused on keeping the build cost down, and so electronic components were sourced from outside companies and interfaced with a bespoke chassis and custom mechanical parts designed and manufactured on site at the University. All the programming was conducted using the proprietary BASIC language, which is freely available from the PicAXE supplier at no cost. This paper will discuss the restrictions involved in building a robot chassis around 'off-theshelf' components, and the issues arising from making the human-machine interaction intuitive whilst only using low-cost ultrasonic sensors. Programming issues will also be discussed, such as the control of accuracy when interfacing a PicAXE microcontroller with a Devantech MD25 Motor Controller board. Public live testing of the system was conducted at the Kinetica Art Fair 2010 event in London and has since been picked up by websites such as Engadget.com and many others. Feedback on the system will be described, as well as the refinements made as a result of these tests
Barlow, Chris
b05c692c-ba1c-4b9e-a9b1-e7dff049e0ef
Lewis, Darren
f022187b-7905-4cc8-b75f-3dc2b57002b3
Bell, Jonathon
42f79ea2-baba-4263-96a7-7b1acdb79162
Irps, Thomas
6ccb2786-5f5a-4b37-9ca8-608caa76725f
Prior, Stephen D.
9c753e49-092a-4dc5-b4cd-6d5ff77e9ced
Erbil, Mehmet Ali
07c050c5-b5fa-4cda-951d-ea123f6402b9
Barlow, Chris
b05c692c-ba1c-4b9e-a9b1-e7dff049e0ef
Lewis, Darren
f022187b-7905-4cc8-b75f-3dc2b57002b3
Bell, Jonathon
42f79ea2-baba-4263-96a7-7b1acdb79162
Irps, Thomas
6ccb2786-5f5a-4b37-9ca8-608caa76725f
Prior, Stephen D.
9c753e49-092a-4dc5-b4cd-6d5ff77e9ced
Erbil, Mehmet Ali
07c050c5-b5fa-4cda-951d-ea123f6402b9

Barlow, Chris, Lewis, Darren, Bell, Jonathon, Irps, Thomas, Prior, Stephen D. and Erbil, Mehmet Ali (2010) Developing a low-cost beer dispensing robotic system for the service industry. 25th International Conference on CAD/CAM, Robotics and Factories of the Future, South Africa. 13 - 16 Jul 2010.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

As the prices of commercially available electronic and mechanical components decrease, manufacturers such as Devantech and Revolution Education have made encoded motor controller systems and microcontrollers very accessible to engineers and designers. This has made it possible to design sophisticated robotic and mechatronic systems very rapidly and at relatively low cost. A recent project in the Autonomous Systems Lab at Middlesex University, UK was to design and build a small, automated, robotic bartender based around the 5 litre Heineken 'Draughtkeg' system, which is capable of patrolling a bar and dispensing beer when signalled to by a customer. Because the system was designed as a commercial product, design constraints focused on keeping the build cost down, and so electronic components were sourced from outside companies and interfaced with a bespoke chassis and custom mechanical parts designed and manufactured on site at the University. All the programming was conducted using the proprietary BASIC language, which is freely available from the PicAXE supplier at no cost. This paper will discuss the restrictions involved in building a robot chassis around 'off-theshelf' components, and the issues arising from making the human-machine interaction intuitive whilst only using low-cost ultrasonic sensors. Programming issues will also be discussed, such as the control of accuracy when interfacing a PicAXE microcontroller with a Devantech MD25 Motor Controller board. Public live testing of the system was conducted at the Kinetica Art Fair 2010 event in London and has since been picked up by websites such as Engadget.com and many others. Feedback on the system will be described, as well as the refinements made as a result of these tests

PDF
Prior-developing_a_low_cost_beer_dispensing_system_FOF_2010.pdf - Other
Download (422kB)

More information

Published date: July 2010
Venue - Dates: 25th International Conference on CAD/CAM, Robotics and Factories of the Future, South Africa, 2010-07-13 - 2010-07-16
Organisations: Aeronautics, Astronautics & Comp. Eng

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 342844
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/342844
PURE UUID: 0994404d-4545-4273-accf-db83587f9321
ORCID for Stephen D. Prior: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4993-4942

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Sep 2012 14:24
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:26

Export record

Contributors

Author: Chris Barlow
Author: Darren Lewis
Author: Jonathon Bell
Author: Thomas Irps
Author: Mehmet Ali Erbil

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×