The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Multi-beam multi-target pulsed laser deposition: Beyond single beam deposition

Multi-beam multi-target pulsed laser deposition: Beyond single beam deposition
Multi-beam multi-target pulsed laser deposition: Beyond single beam deposition
Many labs are currently using Pulsed Laser Deposition for rapid growth of a range of materials that would naturally includes metals, dielectrics, semiconductors, functional materials such as ferroelectrics or piezoelectrics, biomaterials, and more. Each PLD set-up will also have been designed around a particular interest or application area which might be the basic growth process itself, involving a range of on-line diagnostics, or the optimisation of a particular material, in terms of film quality, properties, thickness or size. However, while some labs may use multiple targets, via carrousels or specialist composite sector targets, one factor which is common to most facilities is that a single laser is used to ablate these targets and films are grown from a single laser plume/substrate interaction process.
We have chosen to extend the basic single beam/single target geometry to a new 3 laser/ 3 target deposition set-up, and we believe this offers unique new capabilities within PLD research. Three independent laser plumes allow either a sequential or coincident deposition capability. If sequential deposition is implemented, there is the added flexibility of adjusting the temporal delay so that plume-plume interactions can be either utilised or avoided. Use of multiple plumes means that oxide films for example can now be grown from their separate constituents, and dopants can be added to a growing film in a gradual or graded manner, for applications in lasing planar waveguides. Combinatorial growth can be explored in a manner equivalent to the RGB three colour palette. Films that incorporate lateral or horizontal variation such as donut structures can be fabricated and new materials such as quaternary or penternary oxide crystals can be grown from ternary targets. Finally, multilayers, superlattices and mixed films are readily grown, by rapid shuttering of the individual plumes or incident lasers.
Our work to date using multiple targets and laser beams will be described, for end applications that require low loss, single crystal films for lasing and amplifying end applications. I will describe what we now consider as routinely achievable and also our wish list for truly exotic fabrication strategies involving both horizontal and vertically integrated growth.
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020

Eason, R.W. (2011) Multi-beam multi-target pulsed laser deposition: Beyond single beam deposition. ICMCTF 2011: 38th International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings & Thin Films, San Diego, United States. 01 - 05 May 2011.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Many labs are currently using Pulsed Laser Deposition for rapid growth of a range of materials that would naturally includes metals, dielectrics, semiconductors, functional materials such as ferroelectrics or piezoelectrics, biomaterials, and more. Each PLD set-up will also have been designed around a particular interest or application area which might be the basic growth process itself, involving a range of on-line diagnostics, or the optimisation of a particular material, in terms of film quality, properties, thickness or size. However, while some labs may use multiple targets, via carrousels or specialist composite sector targets, one factor which is common to most facilities is that a single laser is used to ablate these targets and films are grown from a single laser plume/substrate interaction process.
We have chosen to extend the basic single beam/single target geometry to a new 3 laser/ 3 target deposition set-up, and we believe this offers unique new capabilities within PLD research. Three independent laser plumes allow either a sequential or coincident deposition capability. If sequential deposition is implemented, there is the added flexibility of adjusting the temporal delay so that plume-plume interactions can be either utilised or avoided. Use of multiple plumes means that oxide films for example can now be grown from their separate constituents, and dopants can be added to a growing film in a gradual or graded manner, for applications in lasing planar waveguides. Combinatorial growth can be explored in a manner equivalent to the RGB three colour palette. Films that incorporate lateral or horizontal variation such as donut structures can be fabricated and new materials such as quaternary or penternary oxide crystals can be grown from ternary targets. Finally, multilayers, superlattices and mixed films are readily grown, by rapid shuttering of the individual plumes or incident lasers.
Our work to date using multiple targets and laser beams will be described, for end applications that require low loss, single crystal films for lasing and amplifying end applications. I will describe what we now consider as routinely achievable and also our wish list for truly exotic fabrication strategies involving both horizontal and vertically integrated growth.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 2011
Venue - Dates: ICMCTF 2011: 38th International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings & Thin Films, San Diego, United States, 2011-05-01 - 2011-05-05
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 343064
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/343064
PURE UUID: 402d4639-ebe5-4c73-9611-9905d5f69d8d
ORCID for R.W. Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Sep 2012 10:07
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:36

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×