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A novel approach to analysing fixed points in complex systems

A novel approach to analysing fixed points in complex systems
A novel approach to analysing fixed points in complex systems
Complex systems are frequently characterised as systems of many components whose interactions drive a plethora of emergent phenomena. Understanding the history and future behaviour of planet Earth, arguably the most complex known system in the universe, is an ambitious goal and remains at the core of complexity science. From the establishment of the planet's magnetic dipole, to the interplay between life and it's environment. The dynamics across all scales are characterised by their numerous interacting components.

Of particular interest is how such a system may be stable at all, and the role of life in establishing this apparent stability. We present a novel analytic approach to a model of a coupled life-environment system. The model demonstrates that even random couplings between many many species, and a multidimensional environment can produce stable, and robust configurations. The extent to which this observation is general, rather than being unique to the intricacies of the model may only be revealed by thorough analysis. The model is found to be invariant with the number of biotic components past a lower limit. Additionally, rather than increases in environmental complexity leading to a reduction in the possibility of steady states, it is proven that the converse is true, suggesting that the proposed mechanism may be applicable to even high dimensional complexity.
Weaver, Iain S.
07d26f51-efdd-442b-8504-3c86b19e6106
Dyke, J. G.
e2cc1b09-ae44-4525-88ed-87ee08baad2c
Weaver, Iain S.
07d26f51-efdd-442b-8504-3c86b19e6106
Dyke, J. G.
e2cc1b09-ae44-4525-88ed-87ee08baad2c

Weaver, Iain S. and Dyke, J. G. (2012) A novel approach to analysing fixed points in complex systems At European Conference for Complex Systems 2012, Belgium. 03 - 07 Sep 2012.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Complex systems are frequently characterised as systems of many components whose interactions drive a plethora of emergent phenomena. Understanding the history and future behaviour of planet Earth, arguably the most complex known system in the universe, is an ambitious goal and remains at the core of complexity science. From the establishment of the planet's magnetic dipole, to the interplay between life and it's environment. The dynamics across all scales are characterised by their numerous interacting components.

Of particular interest is how such a system may be stable at all, and the role of life in establishing this apparent stability. We present a novel analytic approach to a model of a coupled life-environment system. The model demonstrates that even random couplings between many many species, and a multidimensional environment can produce stable, and robust configurations. The extent to which this observation is general, rather than being unique to the intricacies of the model may only be revealed by thorough analysis. The model is found to be invariant with the number of biotic components past a lower limit. Additionally, rather than increases in environmental complexity leading to a reduction in the possibility of steady states, it is proven that the converse is true, suggesting that the proposed mechanism may be applicable to even high dimensional complexity.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 7 September 2012
Venue - Dates: European Conference for Complex Systems 2012, Belgium, 2012-09-03 - 2012-09-07
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 343094
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/343094
PURE UUID: 0ab8b1d5-50e7-4f85-a16c-2c85cbd997fd
ORCID for J. G. Dyke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6779-1682

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Sep 2012 10:01
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:24

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Contributors

Author: Iain S. Weaver
Author: J. G. Dyke ORCID iD

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