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Aggressive behaviour in adults with learning disabilities

Aggressive behaviour in adults with learning disabilities
Aggressive behaviour in adults with learning disabilities
Aggression in the form of verbal and physical aggression and property destruction are common in adults with Learning Disabilities. This essay examines the psychological aspects of aggression in this population from a challenging behaviour perspective, and outlines subsequent implications for intervention. A number of personal factors increase the risk of aggression, and the relationship with mental health problems is especially strong. Specific cognitions are observed in those with aggressive behaviour, though whether these are due to global deficits is unclear. Anger has historically been overlooked as an important aspect in the literature, though more recent research suggests anger management groups may be beneficial. The views of care staff are especially important, and training may alter staff attitudes and consequently improve aggression in clients. Experimental functional analyses have demonstrated a number of common functions of aggression such as attention and escape, which can be used to alter environmental factors and inform psychological formulations. Research suggests that behavioural interventions, especially if informed by functional analyses can reduce aggression. New techniques such as mindfulness have also begun to show promise with this client group. Research has often overlooked the similarities between those with and without learning disabilities in terms of potential causes of aggression. Future research should therefore seek to apply theory from other adult populations to those with learning disabilities specifically.
1746-6008
64-63.
Richardson, Thomas
f8d84122-b061-4322-a594-5ef2eb5cad0d
Richardson, Thomas
f8d84122-b061-4322-a594-5ef2eb5cad0d

Richardson, Thomas (2013) Aggressive behaviour in adults with learning disabilities. Clinical Psychology and People With Learning Disabilities, 11 ((1&2)), 64-63..

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aggression in the form of verbal and physical aggression and property destruction are common in adults with Learning Disabilities. This essay examines the psychological aspects of aggression in this population from a challenging behaviour perspective, and outlines subsequent implications for intervention. A number of personal factors increase the risk of aggression, and the relationship with mental health problems is especially strong. Specific cognitions are observed in those with aggressive behaviour, though whether these are due to global deficits is unclear. Anger has historically been overlooked as an important aspect in the literature, though more recent research suggests anger management groups may be beneficial. The views of care staff are especially important, and training may alter staff attitudes and consequently improve aggression in clients. Experimental functional analyses have demonstrated a number of common functions of aggression such as attention and escape, which can be used to alter environmental factors and inform psychological formulations. Research suggests that behavioural interventions, especially if informed by functional analyses can reduce aggression. New techniques such as mindfulness have also begun to show promise with this client group. Research has often overlooked the similarities between those with and without learning disabilities in terms of potential causes of aggression. Future research should therefore seek to apply theory from other adult populations to those with learning disabilities specifically.

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Published date: 2013
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 343582
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/343582
ISSN: 1746-6008
PURE UUID: d90d7688-f6c8-4a89-96e2-ab2504768694

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Date deposited: 09 Oct 2012 10:00
Last modified: 11 Dec 2021 00:58

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