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The effect of distraction on face and voice recognition

The effect of distraction on face and voice recognition
The effect of distraction on face and voice recognition
The results of two experiments are presented which explore the effect of distractor items on face and voice recognition. Following from the suggestion that voice processing is relatively weak compared to face processing, it was anticipated that voice recognition would be more affected by the presentation of distractor items between study and test compared to face recognition. Using a sequential matching task with a fixed interval between study and test that either incorporated distractor items or did not, the results supported our prediction. Face recognition remained strong irrespective of the number of distractor items between study and test. In contrast, voice recognition was significantly impaired by the presence of distractor items regardless of their number (Experiment 1). This pattern remained whether distractor items were highly similar to the targets or not (Experiment 2). These results offer support for the proposal that voice processing is a relatively vulnerable method of identification.
0340-0727
167-175
Stevenage, Sarah V.
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Neil, Greg J.
85453750-0611-48d9-a83e-da95cd4e80b3
Barlow, Jess
555fb70c-ee29-486f-9690-ab3900be50e0
Dyson, Amy
245c3986-e61b-4e88-b9ba-ddf3488487ef
Eaton-Brown, Catherine
49f0b437-104a-4620-97fe-238a023bae01
Parsons, Beth
1376660b-9393-45f8-b73e-faebf1d2decf
Stevenage, Sarah V.
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Neil, Greg J.
85453750-0611-48d9-a83e-da95cd4e80b3
Barlow, Jess
555fb70c-ee29-486f-9690-ab3900be50e0
Dyson, Amy
245c3986-e61b-4e88-b9ba-ddf3488487ef
Eaton-Brown, Catherine
49f0b437-104a-4620-97fe-238a023bae01
Parsons, Beth
1376660b-9393-45f8-b73e-faebf1d2decf

Stevenage, Sarah V., Neil, Greg J., Barlow, Jess, Dyson, Amy, Eaton-Brown, Catherine and Parsons, Beth (2012) The effect of distraction on face and voice recognition. Psychological Research, 77 (2), 167-175. (doi:10.1007/s00426-012-0450-z). (PMID:22926436)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The results of two experiments are presented which explore the effect of distractor items on face and voice recognition. Following from the suggestion that voice processing is relatively weak compared to face processing, it was anticipated that voice recognition would be more affected by the presentation of distractor items between study and test compared to face recognition. Using a sequential matching task with a fixed interval between study and test that either incorporated distractor items or did not, the results supported our prediction. Face recognition remained strong irrespective of the number of distractor items between study and test. In contrast, voice recognition was significantly impaired by the presence of distractor items regardless of their number (Experiment 1). This pattern remained whether distractor items were highly similar to the targets or not (Experiment 2). These results offer support for the proposal that voice processing is a relatively vulnerable method of identification.

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Published date: 29 August 2012
Organisations: Cognition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 343747
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/343747
ISSN: 0340-0727
PURE UUID: 19f9f524-7dbe-4558-9d62-c9e0f0389a5f
ORCID for Sarah V. Stevenage: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4155-2939

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Date deposited: 09 Oct 2012 15:56
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:06

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