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How fast can predictability influence word skipping during reading?

How fast can predictability influence word skipping during reading?
How fast can predictability influence word skipping during reading?
Participants' eye movements were tracked when reading sentences in which target word predictability was manipulated to being unpredictable from the preceding context, predictable from the sentence preceding the one in which the target word was embedded, or predictable from the adjective directly preceding the target word. Results show that there was no difference in skipping rates between the 2 predictability conditions, which were skipped more often than the neutral condition. This suggests that predictability can impact the decision of whether to skip a word to a similar degree irrespective of whether the predictability originated from the prior word or the entire preceding sentence context. This finding can only be explained by models of eye-movement control during reading that assume that word n is processed up to a high level before the decision to skip word n + 1 is made.
0278-7393
1054-1063
Fitzsimmons, Gemma
ac6b7c69-8992-44f1-92ca-05aa22e75129
Drieghe, Denis
dfe41922-1cea-47f4-904b-26d5c9fe85ce
Fitzsimmons, Gemma
ac6b7c69-8992-44f1-92ca-05aa22e75129
Drieghe, Denis
dfe41922-1cea-47f4-904b-26d5c9fe85ce

Fitzsimmons, Gemma and Drieghe, Denis (2013) How fast can predictability influence word skipping during reading? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39 (4), 1054-1063. (doi:10.1037/a0030909). (PMID:23244054)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Participants' eye movements were tracked when reading sentences in which target word predictability was manipulated to being unpredictable from the preceding context, predictable from the sentence preceding the one in which the target word was embedded, or predictable from the adjective directly preceding the target word. Results show that there was no difference in skipping rates between the 2 predictability conditions, which were skipped more often than the neutral condition. This suggests that predictability can impact the decision of whether to skip a word to a similar degree irrespective of whether the predictability originated from the prior word or the entire preceding sentence context. This finding can only be explained by models of eye-movement control during reading that assume that word n is processed up to a high level before the decision to skip word n + 1 is made.

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Accepted/In Press date: December 2012
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 December 2012
Published date: 2013
Organisations: Research Performance, Cognition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 343757
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/343757
ISSN: 0278-7393
PURE UUID: 76c7585a-ce6d-453e-9afe-482f85098a34
ORCID for Gemma Fitzsimmons: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4519-0499

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Date deposited: 09 Oct 2012 16:03
Last modified: 22 Mar 2019 01:41

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