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The peak to mean pressure decrease ratio: a new method of assessing aortic stenosis

The peak to mean pressure decrease ratio: a new method of assessing aortic stenosis
The peak to mean pressure decrease ratio: a new method of assessing aortic stenosis
Background: the ratio of peak to mean pressure decrease is a new measure of transaortic continuous waveform shape that could be useful for grading aortic stenosis.

Methods: we retrospectively analyzed echocardiograms in 163 patients with all grades of aortic stenosis as assessed by the continuity equation.

Results: the peak to mean pressure decrease ratio was 1.75 (0.14) in mild stenosis, 1.66 (0.13) in moderate stenosis, 1.56 (0.10) in severe stenosis, and 1.57 (0.07) in severe aortic stenosis with left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40\%. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a threshold of less than 1.50 gave a specificity of 94\% against continuity area whereas a ratio less than 1.75 gave a sensitivity of 96\%.

Conclusion: the peak to mean pressure decrease ratio is a simple and quick cue to the likelihood of severe aortic stenosis in patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction when transaortic pressure decreases appear only moderate.
0894-7317
674-678
Chambers, John
b1d5e666-1509-47a1-95eb-f6def4883135
Rajani, Ronak
d5ebf00d-fbdb-47a2-8f17-89b47fb78daf
Hankins, Matthew
ce4b7d68-3320-4af4-9dd7-3537a4b07219
Cook, Robert
b53f127c-845c-4679-8ab9-d49b7cb96807
Chambers, John
b1d5e666-1509-47a1-95eb-f6def4883135
Rajani, Ronak
d5ebf00d-fbdb-47a2-8f17-89b47fb78daf
Hankins, Matthew
ce4b7d68-3320-4af4-9dd7-3537a4b07219
Cook, Robert
b53f127c-845c-4679-8ab9-d49b7cb96807

Chambers, John, Rajani, Ronak, Hankins, Matthew and Cook, Robert (2005) The peak to mean pressure decrease ratio: a new method of assessing aortic stenosis. Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, 18 (6), 674-678. (doi:10.1016/j.echo.2004.09.028). (PMID:15947772)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: the ratio of peak to mean pressure decrease is a new measure of transaortic continuous waveform shape that could be useful for grading aortic stenosis.

Methods: we retrospectively analyzed echocardiograms in 163 patients with all grades of aortic stenosis as assessed by the continuity equation.

Results: the peak to mean pressure decrease ratio was 1.75 (0.14) in mild stenosis, 1.66 (0.13) in moderate stenosis, 1.56 (0.10) in severe stenosis, and 1.57 (0.07) in severe aortic stenosis with left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40\%. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a threshold of less than 1.50 gave a specificity of 94\% against continuity area whereas a ratio less than 1.75 gave a sensitivity of 96\%.

Conclusion: the peak to mean pressure decrease ratio is a simple and quick cue to the likelihood of severe aortic stenosis in patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction when transaortic pressure decreases appear only moderate.

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Published date: June 2005
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 343936
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/343936
ISSN: 0894-7317
PURE UUID: 4491f9ff-429f-4a8f-a607-f790c72a1989

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Date deposited: 15 Nov 2012 15:13
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:52

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